Aging in our World


http://www.prb.org/Publications/Datasheets/2014/2014-world-population-data-sheet/data-sheet.aspx

How Neighborhoods Affect the Health and Well-Being of Older Americans

 

February 2017: Report Most Americans say they want to age in place in their own communities, but their health and ability to remain independent is shaped in part by their neighborhoods. Research finds that the social, economic, demographic, and physical characteristics of communities may influence older residents’ health and well-being.

Baby Boomers and Millennials Boost Population in Parts of Rural America

January 2017: Article Two demographic groups—young adults ages 20 to 34 and older adults ages 65 and older—are reshaping the population in rural America. Changes in the U.S. economy have attracted young adults to rural areas rich in natural resources away from smaller metropolitan and nearby nonmetropolitan areas. The older adult population, on the other hand, has grown rapidly in areas with strong ties to recreation—areas with robust entertainment industries or natural amenities such as mountains, lakes, and forests—many of which are in less-populated areas.

Longevity Research: Unraveling the Determinants of Healthy Aging and Longer Life Spans

November 2016: Report Most people know about the importance of eating a healthy diet, exercising, maintaining a healthy weight, and avoiding smoking to prevent disease and increase longevity. But researchers have identified many other factors—including genetics, social connections, early-life experiences, and even certain personality traits—that may affect life expectancy.

INFOGRAPHIC

Family Caregiving for People With Dementia Infographic

This infographic illustrates data on family caregiving for people with dementia.

Today’s Research on Aging: Family Caregiving

February 2016: Report This report highlights recent National Institute on Aging-supported research on the impact of caregiving on family members, the dynamics of caregiving within extended families, and the future need and availability of family care.

Family Caregiving for Older People

February 2016: Article In the United States, the vast majority of care that allows older people to live in their own homes is provided by family members who do not receive pay for their services. As the older share of the population increases and people live longer with chronic disabling conditions, particularly dementia, meeting the care needs of older Americans will become more challenging for families.

AUDIO

NPR Coverage of PRB Population Bulletin on Aging

PRB’s Population Bulletin on aging in the United States was covered on NPR’s “All Things Considered” by Ina Jaffe, who focuses on the aging of America.

Aging Baby Boomers to Face Caregiving, Obesity, Inequality Challenges

January 2016: Report The aging of the baby boom generation could fuel a 75 percent increase in the number of Americans ages 65 and older requiring nursing home care, to about 2.3 million in 2030 from 1.3 million in 2010, the Population Reference Bureau (PRB) projects in a new report.

Effects of the Great Recession on Older Americans’ Health and Well-Being

November 2015: Report This report summarizes recent research conducted by National Institute on Aging-supported researchers and others who have studied the effects of the recession on the health and well-being of older Americans.

Effects of the Great Recession on Older Americans’ Health and Well-Being

November 2015: Article Although young adults in their 20s and 30s bore the brunt of the Great Recession (2007 to 2009), many Americans ages 50 and older were also affected by rising unemployment, falling home values, and the decline in the stock market.

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About eslkevin

I am a peace educator who has taken time to teach and work in countries such as the USA, Germany, Japan, Nicaragua, Mexico, the UAE, Kuwait, Oman over the past 4 decades.
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