ANTI-IMMIGRANT POLICIES FROM 1917 TO 2017


JSTOR Daily

ANTI-IMMIGRANT POLICIES FROM 1917 TO 2017
BY SUZANNE ENZERINK
Anti-immigrant fervor has a long history in the United States. The 1917 Immigration Act, for instance, banned all immigration from a geographic area designated the “Asiatic Barred Zone.” No one from the Asia-Pacific zone, regardless of education or class, was permitted.

Literary culture reflected the political climate, too, with writers like Jack London penning anti-immigrant warnings. The era set the terms by which we determine who “deserves” to migrate—even today.

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WHO KILLED THE ICEMAN?
BY JAMES MACDONALD
The crime happened over 5,000 years ago, and we still don’t know who killed Ötzi the Iceman with an arrow.

PHOTOGRAPHING APARTHEID
BY ELLEN C. CALDWELL
Margaret Bourke-White’s photo-essays for Life “were most Americans’ visual introduction to apartheid…”

SCIENTISTS HAVE ALWAYS BEEN POLITICAL
BY LIVIA GERSHON
Questions about who pays for research, and who gets to do it, often influence the type of work that gets done.

SESAME STREET’S EARLY CONTROVERSIAL YEARS
BY ERIN BLAKEMORE
The show set the bar for a new kind of public television, but it wasn’t always beloved.

READ THIS BEFORE YOU MAKE FUN OF COMIC SANS
BY LAUREN HUDGINS
From Narratively: It’s the font everyone loves to hate. But my dyslexic sister helped me see how valuable those much-maligned letters can be.

 


WHAT WE’RE READING AROUND THE WEB
THE EDITORS

JSTOR Daily editors select stories that bridge the gap between news and scholarship. This week’s picks cover interventionism, incredible octopuses, and green energy.

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About eslkevin

I am a peace educator who has taken time to teach and work in countries such as the USA, Germany, Japan, Nicaragua, Mexico, the UAE, Kuwait, Oman over the past 4 decades.
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