How To Communicate With People In Distress


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May 2017 Edition

 

How To Communicate With People In Distress

By Nate Regier on May 17, 2017
Communicating with people who are in distress is no fun. It doesn’t have to be this way. With the right strategies, you can be a positive influence. Here are six tips to raise your awareness about the nature of distress and help you keep from getting dragged in.

The post How To Communicate With People In Distress appeared first on Next Element.
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Communicating with Emotionally Distressed lndividuals Listening, Reflecting, Connecting and Caring

One of the greatest resources for dealing with emotional pain is feeling and believing that other people care about you and are there to support you. Therefore we want to help people in emotional distress feel like we understand them and care about them. Given how important it is to communicate effectively with people in emotional distress the following can enhance our communication skills so that we can more effectively express to individuals that we are listening to them and understand what they are saying to us. Listen, listen, and tisten: Emotionally distressed individuals are carrying an emotional burden and have a need to lighten their load. Your role is to help them emotionally wind down so that you can eventually help them identify and choose next steps/options for support. Ventilate Feelings: You do this by allowing the distressed person to vent; you listen and ask questions, more venting, more listening, more questions, more venting. EG; “tell me more”, how did that make you feel?”, “what happened next?” paraphrasing/Reflection: Restate to individuals what you are hearing from them. “You are saying.’.”. This also encourages the person in distress to continue talking and communicates that you understand what that person is saying. Your reflections express acceptance and concern without being judgmental. However be cautious of

One of the greatest resources for dealing with emotional pain is feeling and believing that other people care about you and are there to support you. Therefore we want to help people in emotional distress feel like we understand them and care about them. Given how important it is to communicate effectively with people in emotional distress the following can enhance our communication skills so that we can more effectively express to individuals that we are listening to them and understand what they are saying to us. Listen, listen, and tisten: Emotionally distressed individuals are carrying an emotional burden and have a need to lighten their load. Your role is to help them emotionally wind down so that you can eventually help them identify and choose next steps/options for support. Ventilate Feelings: You do this by allowing the distressed person to vent; you listen and ask questions, more venting, more listening, more questions, more venting. EG; “tell me more”, how did that make you feel?”, “what happened next?” paraphrasing/Reflection: Restate to individuals what you are hearing from them. “You are saying.’.”. This also encourages the person in distress to continue talking and communicates that you understand what that person is saying. Your reflections express acceptance and concern without being judgmental. However be cautious of stating back the exact words/content that has just been stated by the individual. Attempt to emotionally paraphrase what is being expressed by the individual. Empathetic and non-judgmental responses: Offering empathy and compassion while avoiding rational arguments and quick solutions. Normalize feelings of the distressed person: Not necessarily the event or the behavior however’ EG: “l can see how you might feel so upset hearing such news from your boyfriend”. Exptore Options: Only after the individual has released their emotional burden (vented) can you begin to explore next steps. Helpful questions might include; “what do you need most right now? “what would you like to happen now?”, “how could we get that to happen?”, “what would happen if….(suggestio ns)?” Select action/option: lmportant to provide ongoing support and follow-up for individual during action phase. Walk the person over to the Counseling Center, support the person to make phone calls if needed. Set a time for check in with the person to see how she/he is doing. Self Care: Seek out emotional support for self to debrief from particularly difficult emotional encounters. Ask for time from your HDs/AHDs/other RA/RM/GRMs A

Search Results

[PDF]Communicating with Emotionally Distressed lndividuals Listening …

Given how important it is to communicate effectively with people in emotional distress … eventually help them identify and choose next steps/options for support.

This is how NASA used to hire its astronauts 20 years ago—and it still …

Aug 27, 2015 – Putting several extremely talented, smart and confident people into space together … which there was distress behavior and related communication problems, McGuire accurately …. You can reach out to Nate at Next Element.

Communicating with people in distress – LearnZone

learnzone.org.uk/courses/course.php?id=113

Sage and Thyme model and foundation level workshop, teaching the core skills of dealing with people in distress. The Sage & Thyme workshop reminds staff how to listen and how to respond in a way which empowers the patient. … Use of the SAGE & THYME model is taught in a 3 hour SAGE & …

Emotional support: what to do when someone’s upset, distressed, crying

http://www.redcross.org.uk › What we do › Teaching resources › Teacher briefings

Someone’s upset – crying and distressed. What’s … This might be as simple as, I’m going to sit next to you and we can talk about the best way to help. You can …

Personality vs. Communication | Nate Regier, Ph.D. | Pulse | LinkedIn

Oct 26, 2016 – Nate Regier, Ph.D. … Keynote Speaker at Next Element Consulting … of personality that typecast people, and models of communication that teach people … for motivation of people and for resolving negative distress behavior.

Which Candidate Should You Pick? Go With Agility | Nate Regier, Ph …

Sep 26, 2015 – Nate Regier, Ph.D. … Keynote Speaker at Next Element Consulting … motivational needs,communication styles, and predictable distress behaviors. … the potential to relate to different peopleby matching personality floors.

Working With People With Challenging Behaviors: A Guide for …

Nathan Ory – 2013 – ‎Family & Relationships

Nathan Ory. Intent. to. Communicate. Distress. This group of behaviors is distinguished by its message value. Agitated behaviors begin as spontaneous responses to distress that allow the person to release emotional tension. However, if the …

Understanding distress in people with severe communication difficulties

onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2788.2006.00875.x/abstract
by C Regnard – ‎2007 – ‎Cited by 119 – ‎Related articles

Sep 19, 2006 – Abstract. Background Meaningful communication with people with profoundcommunication difficulties depends on the ability of carers to …

Symptoms of Distress – American Institute for Preventive Medicine

Make a mental note or place a mark next to those items that relate to you — especially when you experience stress. Go back and make a second mark if you …

Evidence-based Practice of Palliative Medicine

Nathan E. Goldstein, ‎Rolfe Sean Morrison – 2013 – ‎Medical

Nathan E. Goldstein, Rolfe Sean Morrison … Interventions That Improve Outcomes for Caregivers ofPeople … RECOMMENDATIONS Family—Provider Communication Interventions for Caregivers of PeopleWith Serious Illnesses … Next, it presents interventions that have been designed to ease the distress of caregiving.

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About eslkevin

I am a peace educator who has taken time to teach and work in countries such as the USA, Germany, Japan, Nicaragua, Mexico, the UAE, Kuwait, Oman over the past 4 decades.
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