What’s behind the ‘golden age’ of travel to New Zealand?


Adapting to New Zealand’s popularity: more tourists or better tourists?

The Hobbiton movie set is the type of innovation the country needs to keep its attractions fresh.

123RF

The Hobbiton movie set is the type of innovation the country needs to keep its attractions fresh.

Consider Ireland, a small island nation of about four million people, with an economy heavily focused on agriculture.

It gets about eight million tourists a year.

New Zealand, which is very similar, gets about 3.5 million.

So what’s our peak tourism number?

READ MORE:
What’s behind the ‘golden age’ of travel?
NZ tourism is flying, and we’re the reason
NZ ill-equipped for 5 million overseas visitors
Our love hate relationship with tourists – New Zealand’s visitor fatigue

“We’re getting closer to it,” Air New Zealand chief executive Christopher Luxon said.

Attractions such as the Tongariro Crossing need management to ensure they continue to be a fantastic experience.

TOM LEE/FAIRFAX NZ

Attractions such as the Tongariro Crossing need management to ensure they continue to be a fantastic experience.

“As I think about the medium-term, that’s when I start to get a little more concerned about how will the country be handling it.”

Infometrics senior economist Benje Patterson said: “We have reached a point where we need to think about how does the tourism sector sustainably contribute to the New Zealand economy.

“It’s probably not just through growing volume, we can grow volumes but at what cost?”

Auckland Airport chief executive Adrian Littlewood, however, who used the Ireland example, differed.

“No I don’t buy that, nope.

Air New Zealand chief executive Christopher Luxon says we are getting closer to peak tourism, meaning the focus should ...

VICTOR RUIZ GARCIA/REUTERS

Air New Zealand chief executive Christopher Luxon says we are getting closer to peak tourism, meaning the focus should shift to more valuable visitors.

“There are no doubt some things we need to solve but I think they can be solved with proper management.”

Back to Air New Zealand, though: Luxon said the challenge was all about getting more “productivity” into the sector, where he saw room for at least another $9 billion of value.

Basically, we need to attract more premium visitors who spend more and stay longer.

“That’s really what we want, more valuable tourists, not just more tourists per se.”

Luxon said the country also needed to think about what he called itinerary innovation, which had lagged.

Infometrics senior economist Benje Patterson says tourism is at a point where its sustainability needs to be questioned.

SUPPLIED

Infometrics senior economist Benje Patterson says tourism is at a point where its sustainability needs to be questioned.

“Essentially, people are coming and doing a tour of New Zealand and they’re kind of doing a lot of what they did 10 years ago.

Ad Feedback

“Now there are new things, like Hobbiton’s been created and has been a huge success, [and] Rotorua Canopy Tours … so there’s been some really good innovations.

“They’re important but we need more of them because if they’re quality experiences we can charge more for them which means we can get greater value out of it.

“That’s what I mean by itinerary innovation, which then leads to higher value pricing, which leads to premium tourists, which creates more value, which creates greater productivity.”

Luxon said the industry was working hard to bring those higher value tourists.

Ireland is a similar size to New Zealand but gets twice as many tourists each year.

SUPPLIED

Ireland is a similar size to New Zealand but gets twice as many tourists each year.

Air New Zealand’s services out of China have changed dramatically because 80 per cent of passengers are coming to spend at least eight days here now, being independent travellers rather than coming in groups.

The airline is also looking to push people out to more of the country, having changed its schedule in October last year so when people land in Auckland they can quickly be flown to places like Napier or Dunedin.

Getting more people flying during the shoulder or off-peak seasons is also important.

Air New Zealand has worked with regional tourism bodies, councils and mayors to help build a unique proposition for each which the airline then spent hundreds of millions of dollars promoting overseas.

Northland is talked about as being the birthplace of a nation with coastal gems, whereas Southland is Bluff oysters and cars.

Auckland International Airport chief executive Adrian Littlewood says there are definitely problems to be solved but it ...

LAWRENCE SMITH/FAIRFAX NZ

Auckland International Airport chief executive Adrian Littlewood says there are definitely problems to be solved but it just needs proper management.

“There are unique bids to all the subregions of New Zealand, they don’t need to compete with each other, they just need to be very differentiated and very distilled about what they are and what they’re not,” Luxon said.

“That’s a reason for a visitors to go to that region, I must go have a Bluff oyster, and if that’s another half a day in the economy spending money, that’s a good thing.”

Patterson agrees with the approach.

“It’s about pushing people up the value chain and trying to create incentives for people that are wanting to come to maybe come outside of those peak times when there’s not as much pressure put on resources and when there is more capacity.”

But for Littlewood, a campervan trip around the South Island last year gave him a different idea.

Even back then, everybody said places were getting very busy, but the most Littlewood had to queue was at the Skyline Gondola in Queenstown.

“On January 4, which is one of the busiest days of the year, it was a 15-minute queue.”

Littlewood said some attractions, such as the Tongariro Crossing, just needed some management to ensure it remained a fantastic experience.

Furthermore, there are lots of sparsely attended locations which have plenty of opportunity to attract more tourists.

The regional aviation market, particularly after Jetstar introduced four regional routes last year, has great fares and means places such as Nelson and Hawke’s Bay are much more attractive destinations.

New Zealand ranked quite low in the world when it came to visitation per population and visits per square kilometre, Littlewood said, meaning there was plenty of room to grow.

“We just need to recognise we are becoming a popular destination and we do want to ensure that those popular locations are managed properly and that we also try and make the most of all the other fantastic locations around the country.

“That’s the benefit of tourism, it is quite distributive, if you have connectivity, whether it’s road or air, you can get people around this country.”

 – Stuff

New Zealand tourism ads too successful: Kiwis overrun by visitors

Feb 2, 2017 – New Zealand’s tourism has been growing strong, partly thanks to … popular hiking tracks maintained by the Department of Conservation (DOC).

Adapting to New Zealand’s popularity: more tourists or better tourists …

Jun 15, 2017 – Adapting to New Zealand’s popularity: more tourists or better tourists? … “It’s probably not just through growing volume, we can grow volumes …

New Zealand’s popularity causing tourist problems | Newshub

May 10, 2017 – New Zealand’s popularity causing tourist problems … The growth has come on much faster than anyone expected,” says Auckland Airport CEO …

New Zealand’s growing population

In 2012, New Zealand’s population was estimated to have passed 4,444,444. … Is population growth of another 2.55 million feasible in less than 50 years?

Vegetarianism on the rise in New Zealand – Roy Morgan Research

Feb 8, 2016 – 2016 has so far been a period of highs and lows for New Zealand’s growing vegetarian population: over 2000 signed a Change.org petition …

P is a ‘growing addiction’ in New Zealand, top cop says as new figures …

Feb 9, 2017 – A police superintendent says methamphetamine, better known as P, is a common andpopular choice of drug in New Zealand – and it’s getting …

Babich Wines looks to capitalise on New Zealand’s growing popularity …

Apr 21, 2017 – David Babich of Babich Wines explains how New Zealand wine producers are having to scale up to cope with increased global demand for its …

New Zealand is running out of hotel rooms for tourists – The Telegraph

http://www.telegraph.co.uk › Travel › Destinations › Oceania › New Zealand › Articles

Mar 21, 2017 – New Zealand is struggling to keep up with its growing popularity, with the number of tourists surpassing the number of hotel beds available.

New Zealand wine growing in popularity in the U.S. – Park Street Imports

Mar 27, 2017 – New Zealand has now become the third largest supplier of wine to the U.S., trailing only France and Italy. In 2016 the wine imported to the U.S. …

Advertisements

About eslkevin

I am a peace educator who has taken time to teach and work in countries such as the USA, Germany, Japan, Nicaragua, Mexico, the UAE, Kuwait, Oman over the past 4 decades.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s