Slaughter of wolves on national forests only possible because of Forest Service complicity–Let’s make sure these unnecessary killings are a catalyst for coexistence with wolves throughout the American West!!!


Dear Kevin,

The state of Washington has killed 31 endangered wolves since 2012. Of those, 26 were shot in the Colville National Forest of northeast Washington on behalf of the same cattle rancher—Diamond M Ranch—which grazes its cattle across 78,000 acres of federal public lands.The specifics are horrifying and barbaric:

First, in 2012, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife killed seven of eight wolves from the Wedge pack. Then it destroyed the entire Profanity Peak pack in 2016. In 2017, it wiped out the Sherman pack by killing one of only two remaining members.

And then in 2019, it slaughtered the rest of the Old Profanity Territory pack. Again, all of these state endangered wolves were killed on federal public land, by Washington’s own state wildlife agency, in a misguided attempt to protect the profits of one cattle corporation.

While the U.S. Forest Service didn’t pull the trigger, the death of these 26 wolves—and destruction of entire wolf packs—was only possible because of Forest Service complicity. To be crystal clear, the agency could put an end to the State of Washington’s wolf-killing on national forests, but refuses to do so.

Unfortunately, the Forest Service’s inaction is symptomatic of a larger problem within the institutions charged with “managing” wildlife on public lands. Much like the federally-funded wildlife killing program, Wildlife Services, the Forest Service has also chosen to blatantly ignore changing public values and scientifically-backed coexistence practices that can proactively avoid and reduce conflicts between native carnivores and livestock.

So yesterday, WildEarth Guardians and our allies filed a lawsuit to hold the Forest Service accountable and end this war on state-listed endangered wolves in the Colville National Forest. We think the agency can and should require ranchers who graze on public lands to coexist with wolves and other native wildlife.

Our next WildEarth Webinar, on Wednesday, June 24, is rightfully titled “Holy Cow: Confronting the Forest Service’s Role in Wolf-Killing.”

In addition to Guardians’ Staff Attorney Jennifer Schwartz and Wildlife Coexistence Campaigner Samantha Bruegger, joining me on the webinar will be Tim Coleman, Executive Director of the Kettle Range Conservation Group.

I encourage you to participate in this webinar as we not only look back at the obscene killing of the entire Profanity Peak pack at the request of public lands livestock interests, but also explore ways that this unnecessary killing can be a catalyst for coexistence with wolves in Washington state and throughout the American West.
For the Wild,John Horning,
Executive Director
Email John
Colville National Forest - Home

About eslkevin

I am a peace educator who has taken time to teach and work in countries such as the USA, Germany, Japan, Nicaragua, Mexico, the UAE, Kuwait, Oman over the past 4 decades.
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1 Response to Slaughter of wolves on national forests only possible because of Forest Service complicity–Let’s make sure these unnecessary killings are a catalyst for coexistence with wolves throughout the American West!!!

  1. Pingback: Slaughter of wolves on national forests only possible because of Forest Service complicity–Let’s make sure these unnecessary killings are a catalyst for coexistence with wolves throughout the American West!!! — Eslkevin’s Blog | huggers.ca

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