You probably heard the great news – after two years of progressive activism, FOX finally cancelled Glenn Beck’s show–but the Boycott Must Go On!!


Dear Kevin,
You probably heard the great news – after two years of progressive activism, FOX finally cancelled Glenn Beck’s show.
Beck was targeted after he slandered President Obama by saying, “This president has exposed himself as a guy, over and over and over again, who has a deep-seated hatred for white people, or the white culture, I don’t know what it is… This guy, I believe, is a racist.”
Activists at ColorOfChange, Media Matters, StopBeck, FoxNewsBoycott, and of course Democrats.com responded with a boycott of advertisers on Glenn Beck’s show. Ultimately over 300 advertisers pulled their ads from Beck, costing FOX over $40 million.
Advertiser boycotts work! And it’s time to boycott all FOX News advertisers:

http://www.democrats.com/boycott-proactiv

We’re starting our boycott of all FOX News with Proactiv, which sells acne medicine to teenagers and young adults. Why?
First, there are lots of other acne treatments. Second, young adults above all are hurt by FOX News, which promotes right-wing policies on race, education, healthcare, the environment, and war. Let’s get our future leaders to lead the fight against FOX News!
Sign the petition to Proactiv and enter the email address of every young adult over 18 you know:

http://www.democrats.com/boycott-proactiv

Beyond President Obama, FOX regularly slanders nearly everyone: Democrats, unionized workers, the unemployed (including veterans and 99ers), environmentalists, feminists, blacks, Hiics, Jews, Muslims, progressives, scientists, and any other group it disagrees with.
FOX News broadcasts rightwing extremist slander, incitement to violence, political propaganda, and outright lies to promote its rightwing political agenda. This is not “news,” but rather a never-ending “war on news” – and it’s all documented in our petition.
Why would any decent company want to fund it? Tell Proactiv to stop advertising on FOX News:

http://www.democrats.com/boycott-proactiv

Thanks for all you do!
Bob Fertik

GLEN BECK ADMITTED in 2007, “I Am RACIST and Barack Obama is very White” THIS MAKES Boycotting FOX NEWS needed NOW

By Kevin Stoda

Dear, American supporters of the Fascist Oddball Xenophobic (FOX) news networks.

AMERICANS are getting less tolerant of your racism and stronghold on our major media.

For example, we have noted that in his 2007 TV program from FOX (See on You-Tube), Glen Beck admitted he himself was racist. Further, Beck then, in contrast to 2009, called Barrack Obama much more white than black. (Apparently, Beck now he has other nonsense to mush men’s minds.)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n0tgvWxC_6A

Using a major news platform to promote racism and to tell people to disrespect a whole presidential administration through mixed truths, outright lies, and xenophobia, is not to be tolerated any more.

On Democracy Now today, Amy Goodman asked Benjamin Jealous of the NAACP what he thought of Wal-Mart’s pull-out from advertising on the Glen Beck program on FOX.

NOTE: Goodman had simply asked , “The whole attack by Glenn Beck that drove this (resignation)? In your response from the NAACP to Van Jones, it says, ´The only thing more outrageous than Mr. Beck’s attack on Van Jones is the fact that there are sponsors that continue to pay him to provide this type of offensive commentary.` Do you support the continued boycott of companies like Wal-Mart of Beck’s show on Fox?”

http://www.democracynow.org/2009/9/8/white_house_environmental_adviser_van_jones

This is a particularly important point because Glen Beck´s HATE CAMPAIGN ON THE OBAMA ADMINISTRATION led recently to a great American policy maker, Van Jones, quitting the government this week.

http://thinkprogress.org/2009/09/06/van-jones-resigns/

Mr. Jealous said, “We certainly support them (Walmart) choosing with their dollars who they’re going to support. I mean, it’s—Glenn Beck is somebody who’s told a seven-year-old girl, a seven-year-old black girl, that he would buy her a ticket back to Africa, that she needed to go back to Africa. And then he comes out, and he says that healthcare is the beginning of reparations. I mean, this guy plays the race card on a weekly basis. He does it very aggressive—you know, in a very hateful way.”

Recall, first, that Van Jones is one of the most important and thoughtful men in America—however, the FOX (Fascist Oddball Xenophobic) news network chose to support a man, like Glen Beck, rather than seeing that tens of millions of Americans need to get health care from promoters like Jones and that our America economy needs to move starting today to the kind of economy that its competitors worldwide are already doing.

http://www.alternet.org/environment/95963/what_will_the_green_economy_look_like/

Let’s quote the wisdom and influential words of Van Jones on the absolute necessity to green the American economy NOW!
“I think it’s really important to point out that we’re sort of at the end of an era of American capitalism, where we thought we could run the economy based on consumption rather than production, credit rather than creativity, borrowing rather than building, and also, most importantly, environmental destruction rather than environmental restoration.”
Jones continued, “We’re trying to make the case in this book that that era is over. We now have to move in a very different direction. And key to that will be basing the US economy not on credit cards, but based on clean energy and the clean energy revolution that would put literally millions of people to work, putting up solar panels all across the United States, weatherizing buildings so they don’t leak so much energy and put up so much carbon, building wind farms and wave farms, manufacturing wind turbines. We argue you could put Detroit back to work not making SUVs to destroy the world, but making wind turbines, 8,000 finely machine parts in each one, twenty tons of steel in each wind tower, making wind turbines to help save the world.”
Finally, Van Jones wisely noted, “So we think that you can fight pollution and poverty at the same time. We think that you can actually power our way through this recession by putting people to work, but we’re going to have to start building things here and re-powering, retrofitting, retooling America, and that that’s the way forward both for the economy, for the earth and for everyday people.”
Note: These statements came from a program on DN from October of last year:

http://www.democracynow.org/2008/10/28/van_jones_on_the_green_collar

Van Beck has written a book of the same title, The Green Collar Economy: How One Solution Can Fix Our Two Biggest Problems.

http://www.harpercollins.com/books/9780061650758/The_Green_Collar_Economy/index.aspx

America needs such voices as Van Jones in government leadership in America—not Fascist Oddball Xenophobic (FOX) types.

Clean up the American airwaves of all its fascism and racism, today.

http://www.pittsburghurbanmedia.com/a-petition-against-fox-conservative-host-glenn-beck.aspx

NOTE: One way to change the noise of Fascist Oddball Xenophobic (FOX) media moguls is to support alternative media organizations

http://aan.org/alternative/Aan/index

and alternative monitoring websites.

http://americas.mediamonitors.net/content/view/full/64380

Another way, is to demand that local radio and TV channels put better programming on, such as Democracy Now or news sources promoted by serious progressive journalists:

http://www.tacomapjh.org/progressive_news.htm

Posted in Uncategorized | 21 Comments

Self-Censorship in Facebook and Twitter Seem to be a Mainstay to Most–Survey Shows


In many cases, self-censorship can be bad for individuals and society.  Is this the case with FACEBOOK and you? For examples of this in other digital media, see Huffington Post. –kasi-368ac1770c2844969e2520203f2852b4-bl0516-censorship.jpegTECH

A Pew Report Shows How Facebook and Twitter Limit Political Debate

By


“Well, what I think it’s doing is giving everyone a voice, right?” Mark Zuckerberg told ABC News in 2010, referring to the social network he founded. “So, back, you know, a few generations ago, people didn’t have a way to share information and express their opinions efficiently to a lot of people. But now they do. Right now, with social networks and other tools on the internet, all of these 500 million people have a way to say what they’re thinking and have their voice be heard.”

It’s a wonderful idea, and one that has fueled much of the excitement of the social-media age. But is it true? Is social media really fostering robust discussion and debate?

According to a new report from the Pew Research Center called “Social Media and the ‘Spiral of Silence,” the answer is no. In fact, it may be doing the opposite. Pew polled 1,801 Americans, asking them about their “opinions about the Snowden leaks, their willingness to talk about the revelations in various in-person and online settings, and their perceptions of the views of those around them in a variety of online and off-line contexts.” (Pew chose the Snowden story in part because polls have showed Americans are relatively evenly divided on it). 

Despite the still-prevailing idealistic vision of social media as a platform for engaged citizenry and robust debate, the report notes that “people were less likely to discuss these issues on social media than they were in person.” Moreover, “if people thought their social media friends and followers disagreed with them, they were less likely to want to discuss the issues at all.”

Here are five important sentences from the report, and what they can tell us about how people debate hot-button issues online:

“The only settings where most people were not willing to discuss their opinion was on Facebook and Twitter.”
Only 42 percent of Facebook users and 41 percent of Twitter users said they’d be willing to discuss Snowden on those platforms, whereas well over half of respondents said they’d talk it over in community meetings, at family dinners, and in several other settings. In fact, 86 percent of Americans said they were willing to discuss Snowden in some offline venue. It appears people find Facebook and Twitter to be a lot less welcoming or engaging for these sorts of discussions.

“Someone who frequently uses the ‘like button’ on Facebook content contributed by other Facebook users (they use it a few times per day) is 1.88 times more likely to feel that their family members share their views, and they are 1.72 times more likely to feel they share the opinions of people in their Facebook network, when compared to those who do not use the like button.”
This is a fascinating finding, and the authors offer a few different explanations for it tied to the idea that Facebook networks tend to be like-minded, and the more engaged you are on Facebook, the more of this agreement you are likely to encounter, which could skew your perception of the extent to which the rest of the world (online and off) agrees with you.

They ignore, however, one important potential mechanism for how this might occur: The more you “like,” the more Facebook shapes the content you are presented via your news feed in a direction its algorithm thinks will increase your engagement. It may well be the case that if you’re liking a lot of stories on Snowden or any other specific news story, Facebook will detect that and serve you up more tasty red meat. (We already know, thanks to Mat Honan’s noble and masochistic experiment in Wired, that weird stuff happens when you click the “like” button indiscriminately.)

“Almost everyone in our sample who reported that they would be willing to discuss something on Twitter or Facebook also indicated that they would be willing to have a conversation on this topic in an offline setting.”
There was barely anyone — just 0.3 percent of those surveyed — who was willing to discuss Snowden online but not offline. One interpretation of this is that people’s online behavior mirrors, to a certain extent, who they are offline: If you’re rant-y and opinionated at parties, you’re rant-y and opinionated on Facebook. Or perhaps social media has emboldened a lot of otherwise quiet people to speak up, and this confidence has extended to their offline interactions. (Purely anecdotally, I find there’s a pretty strong correlation between who is opinionated on my Facebook feed and who is outwardly opinionated in real life.)

One possibility that these numbers rule out, though, is that Twitter and Facebook are at the moment giving a major voice to people who would be unlikely to participate in political debates offline. If that were the case, you’d see much less overlap between the online and offline discussion-havers.

“When social media followers disagree, people are more likely to self-censor offline.”
In many cases, the report notes, social-media use correlated with a lower overall likelihood of joining the conversation about Snowden. If social media increases exposure to differing opinions, the authors write, “this might increase the likelihood that people will choose to withhold their opinion because they know more about the people who will object to it,” and some of the data supports that idea: Facebook members with typical usage rates were 47 percent less likely to want to discuss Snowden with friends at a restaurant, for example, but only 26 percent less likely to talk about Snowden with friends “[i]f they feel that people in their Facebook network agree with their opinion.”

This makes some intuitive sense. If you’ve just emerged from a bruising Facebook comment thread about Snowden, it’s easy to imagine feeling your energy a bit more sapped when that subject comes up at dinner than you would if everyone on your feed agrees.

“[O]n Facebook, women are as likely as men to feel comfortable discussing an important political issue.”
Pew’s report isn’t all bad news. It notes that on Facebook, both women and people with less formal education appeared more willing to discuss Snowden than they did in other settings — most of which tend to be dominated by the voices of men, and particularly well-educated ones. At least a glimmer of that idealistic social-media world is on display here.

***

This report has a lot of moving parts, but most of them point in the same direction: Facebook and Twitter have not done a particularly good job incubating productive political discussion, at least when it comes to one of the most important, hot-button issues of the last few years. But the report definitely shouldn’t be seen as an indictment of social media writ large; rather, this may be more about the limitations and personalities of these two particular platforms than about the wider concept of social-media-fueled political debate.

Pew only scratches the surface of why Facebook and Twitter might tamp down political discussion, for example, and to the extent the researchers speculate about this, they may be downplaying the issues of tone and civility. It could be that people drop out of conversations not when they sense others disagree with them, but when that disagreement is delivered in an overly antagonistic, vehement way. What would the numbers in Pew’s report look like if Facebook and Twitter didn’t lend themselves so easily to outburst and groupthink and snark? Is it possible on popular social-media platforms to build that tone down rather than to exacerbate these all-too-human tendencies?

Finally, it’s important to keep in mind that there’s some incentive misalignment here. Some of us would love better outlets for intelligent online discussion, but neither Facebook nor Twitter has ever claimed this to be among their top priorities. Rather, they want clicks and shares and retweets. Lofty quotes notwithstanding, what are the odds that closed-door meetings of higher-ups in Menlo Park and San Francisco ever involve into discussions about what these companies can do to promote robust and intelligent political dialogue?

People may be asking too much of these platforms — if they want social media that reflects their highest ideals for political debate and inclusion, it could be time to build something new.

Lori Keong contributed research.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Running Into Yourself


 

5 Ways to Turn Your Faith Back into an Adventure

New blog from Doug Hutchcraft

Why is “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles” the number one movie in America for two weeks in a row? Critics hated it! The Turtles received a dismal 20% rating on movie critic site Rotten Tomatoes. But now these green martial arts experts have become an international mega-hit. What in the world is going on?

Simply put: Nostalgia. If you’re like me, favorites from your childhood reach deep into your emotional reservoirs…

 

Join the Conversation

Some friends said, “How would you like to use our condominium down by the ocean in Florida?” It was a very hard decision, but it took us ten seconds. I’ll tell you what, it was really a great place. I never thought I’d stay in a place like that. It had some very distinctive furnishings. Well, yeah, the mirrors! They were everywhere. And they were very strategically placed so you could see the ocean from almost any spot in the house.

I was the first one up that first morning. I was alone. Now, I’m not familiar with this place, okay? I’m puttering around in the kitchen for breakfast. I went over to the kitchen table. I leaned over to get something and suddenly out of the corner of my eye I saw this hand reaching for me. It scared me! Of course I spun around to see who was sneaking up on me. It was me. I hadn’t realized that there was a mirror on the wall right next to me reflecting everything I did. Everywhere I went in this place I kept running into me.

I’m Ron Hutchcraft and I want to have A Word With You today about “Running Into Yourself.”

One of the writers of the Bible kept running into himself everywhere, and he didn’t like what he saw. He wrote words that people have been able to identify with very closely for a long time. His name is Paul. He wrote much of the New Testament, and it says in Romans 7:18, “I have the desire to do what is good, but I can’t carry it out. For what I do is not the good I want to do. No, the evil I do not want to do. This I keep on doing.” Oh for goodness sake, who can’t relate to that, in our marriage, with our kids, with our friends?

Then he says in verse 21, “I find this law at work: when I want to do good, evil is right there with me.” And finally he is desperate. In verse 24 he says, “What a wretched man I am. Who will rescue me from this body of death?” Then he’s got an answer. He says, “Thanks be to God through Jesus Christ our Lord.”

In spite of being a very religious man, Paul kept running into this dark side of himself that was selfish and sinful. Is that unique to him? No! Like that condo we were in, we’ve got a lot of mirrors that show us some things that scare us. If you’re married, your spouse is probably a mirror for you. Your parents are a mirror; showing you things that you may not like about yourself; you may not like to hear.

Our children – man, are they our mirrors! They reflect our inadequacies, our weaknesses, our baggage, our mistakes, and our pain. And even our critics; they’re mirrors. Even if we throw away a lot of what they say as being bias, they still show us things we’d rather not see. And a crisis – now there’s a mirror. Where things are coming apart – that’s where you see the real you.

Now, when our dark side is suddenly staring us in the face, we try to run from it, we try to rationalize it, blame someone else until one day we finally get honest and say, “You know what? There is a darkness inside of me that scares me. I can’t change the ugly parts of me. If I could have, I would have.” And that’s where Paul was here, “Who will rescue me?” And then there’s the answer: God would through Jesus Christ. See, life’s mirrors all seem to say the same thing, “You need a Savior.” And we do.

That’s why the Bible says in Romans 5:8, “While we were still sinners (That’s means running our own lives that God was supposed to run.) God proved His love for us by Christ dying for us. We have this killer disease called sin, and God’s Son came to break its’ power, to die for your sin and mine to be our Rescuer. And then He showed His power over the most powerful force on earth – death, by conquering it on Easter morning.

Couldn’t you use that power in your life, in your relationships, in your family? There’s a new beginning that comes when you get every sin and every mistake forgiven by God. This all happens when you go to the cross of Jesus and you surrender to this wonderful Savior. Have you ever done that? Have you ever started your relationship with Him? If you haven’t and you want to, can I ask you to take the next step on that journey and go to our website ANewStory.com? I want to help you get this going.

Maybe you are even running into yourself in life’s mirrors recently and you don’t like what you see. Look again. Right behind you, just over your shoulder, there’s someone there. That’s Jesus extending His hand to you. Grab Him right now. He’s helped you run into yourself so you’ll run into Him.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

My daughter Lisa passed away four years ago, but private student loan companies refuse to forgive her debt. Join us in calling on her lenders to forgive debt after a borrower’s death.


My daughter Lisa passed away four years ago, but private student loan companies refuse to forgive her debt. Join us in calling on her lenders to forgive debt after a borrower’s death.

 

Kevin –

Four years ago, our daughter Lisa passed away suddenly from a liver disease. 

Our family was shocked — how could someone so young and full of life be gone so soon? Lisa was a truly special person. She was the mother of three beautiful children, and she worked hard to support her kids while putting herself through nursing school. 

My wife and I took Lisa’s three kids into our home and became their legal guardians. Just as we started to put the pieces back together and move forward, that’s when the heartless calls from student loan lenders began. Even though my daughter had just died, they demanded I take over her loan payments, which over the past four years have ballooned to $200,000. Her death didn’t matter to the banks that controlled her student loans, and I don’t think that’s right.

I started a petition on Change.org asking my daughter’s private student loan lenders to forgive her debt. Will you please sign?

I’m the Senior Pastor at Oasis Church in Redlands, California, and my wife works at the church with me. We helped our daughter take out these loans to cover the cost of nursing school, and to make sure there was some money to provide for her children while she was working toward her degree. She was making timely payments on her student loans up until the day she passed away.

Yet instead of forgiving this debt after her death — which is what happens with other forms of debt, like federal student loans — the private student loan companies demanded that our family take on this debt. The lenders all told me that there’s nothing I can do, because private student loans are largely unregulated, and there are no protections for borrowers or their families in the event of unexpected death.

But I know there is something I can do, because petitions on Change.org have convinced private student loan lenders to forgive debt of students who’ve passed away before. The Federal government, and even large private student loan lenders like Sallie Mae and Wells Fargo, all have policies in place to forgive student loans once the borrower dies. With your help, I know we can convince Lisa’s lenders to do the same.

Losing our daughter was painful enough. Please sign our petition to make these lenders forgive her debts.

Lisa wanted to be a nurse so she could help people. Even though she’s gone, maybe her story can help stop these banks from preying on families like ours. 

Thank you,

Pastor Steve Mason
Highland, California

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Sniffing Rosemary Improves Memory


 

A key to improving memory may lie in a common herb — rosemary.

A study presented at the British Psychological Society’s annual conference in Harrogate showed that the smell of the essential oil from the herb appears to enhance the ability to remember events and complex tasks.

The researchers from the University of Northumbria had 66 adults enter one of two rooms — a room with no scent and a room with a rosemary scent. The participants were then tested on their memory functions by finding hidden objects and passing objects to researchers at particular times.

VIDEO: Are Memories Reliable?

The subjects in the rosemary-scented room performed better on the memory tasks than those in the room with no smell.

“In this study we focused on prospective memory, which involves the ability to remember events that will occur in the future and to remember to complete tasks at particular times. This is critical for everyday functioning,” explained author Dr Mark Moss.

Previous work had already hinted toward the effect of rosemary on memory, showing that compounds in the rosemary aroma could improve long-term memory and mental arithmetic.

NEWS: How Leaving a Room Affects Your Memory

And, as the Daily Telegraph points out, the results suggest that Shakespeare knew this all along. In his play, “Hamlet,” Ophelia remarks, “There’s rosemary, that’s for remembrance: pray you, love, remember.”

The researchers hope the findings may help lay a (rosemary-scented) foundation for treating people with memory impairments. — via Press Association.

Photo: iStockPhoto

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

State Of Israel does Not equal Biblical Prophecy!


WARNING TO READERS OF THIS BLOG POSTING: 

While I disagree with the language and the horrible anti-Jewish bent to this article called,

State Of Israel: Not Biblical Prophecy! , I agree with the direction and simple title.   Sadly, the anti-Jewish nature of this document condemns most of the document ITSELF. It looks like the anti-Jewish propaganda stemming from the Middle Ages in Europe–yet it speaks to the truth that Israel today does in NO WAY resemble to kingdom predicted in the Bible.  I share this information here only because it represents a trend in internet media, which has power because using a partial truth takes one far in any propaganda campaign.–kas

THE STATE OF ISRAEL IS NOT A FULFILLMENT OF BIBLICAL PROPHECY

JEWS & EVANGELICAL CHRISTIANS claim that the modern State of Israel is a fulfillment of Biblical prophecy. This claim evinces a shallow and errant understanding of the Bible.

 t

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Aviva Chomsky: America’s Continuing Border Crisis The Real Story Behind the “Invasion” of the Children


Tomgram: Aviva Chomsky, What’s at Stake in the Border Debate

The militarization of the police has been underway since 9/11, but only in the aftermath of the six-shot killing of an unarmed teenager in Ferguson, Missouri, with photos of streets in a St. Louis suburb that looked like occupied Iraq or Afghanistan, has the fact of it, the shock of it, seemed to hit home widely.  Congressional representatives are now proposing bills to stop the Pentagon from giving the latest in war equipment to local police forces.  The president even interrupted his golfing vacation on Martha’s Vineyard to return to Washington, in part for “briefings” on the ongoing crisis in Ferguson.  So militarization is finally a major story.

And that’s no small thing.  On the other hand, the news from Ferguson can’t begin to catch the full process of militarization this society has been undergoing or the way America’s distant wars are coming home. We have, at least, a fine book by Radley Balko on how the police have been militarized.  Unfortunately, on the subject of the militarization of the country, there is none.  And yet from armed soldiers in railway stations to the mass surveillance of Americans, from the endless celebration of our “warriors” to thedomestic use of drones, this country has been undergoing a significant process of militarization (and, if there were such a word, national securitization).

Perhaps nowhere has this been truer than on America’s bordersand on the subject of immigration.  It’s no longer “give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free.”  The U.S. is in the process of becoming a citadel nation with up-armored, locked-down borders and a Border Patrol operating in a “Constitution-free zone” deep into the country.  The news is regularly filled with discussions of the need to “bolster border security” in ways that would have been unimaginable to previous generations.  In the meantime, the Border Patrol is producing its own set of Ferguson-style killings as, like SWAT teams around the U.S., it adopts an ever more militarized mindset and the weaponry to go with it.  As James Tomsheck, the former head of internal affairs for U.S. Customs and Border Protection, put it recently, “It has been suggested by Border Patrol leadership that they are the Marine Corps of the U.S. law enforcement community.  The Border Patrol has a self-identity of a paramilitary border security force and not that of a law enforcement organization.”

It’s in this context that the emotional flare-up over undocumented Central American children crossing the southern border by the thousands took place.  In fact, without the process of militarization, that “debate” — with its discussion of “invasions,” “surges,” “terrorists,” and “tip of the spear” solutions — makes no sense.  Its language was far more appropriate to the invasion and occupation of Iraq than the arrival in this country of desperate kids, fleeing hellish conditions, and often looking for their parents.

Aviva Chomsky is the author of a new history of just how the words “immigration” and “illegal” became wedded — it wasn’t talked about that way not so many decades ago — and how immigrants became demonized in ways that are familiar in American history.  The Los Angeles Times has hailedUndocumented: How Immigration Became Illegal for adding “smart, new, and provocative scholarship to the immigration debate.” As in her book, so today at TomDispatch, Chomsky puts the most recent version of the immigration “debate” into a larger context, revealing just what we prefer not to see in our increasingly up-armored nation. Tom

America’s Continuing Border Crisis
The Real Story Behind the “Invasion” of the Children
By Aviva Chomsky

Call it irony or call it a nightmare, but the “crisis” of Central American children crossing the U.S.-Mexican border, which lasted for months amid fervent and angry debate, is now fading from the news.  The media stories have been legion, the words expended many.  And yet, as the “crisis” leaves town, as the sound and fury die down and attention shifts elsewhere (even though the children continue to arrive), the real factors that would have made sense of what’s been happening remain essentially untouched and largely unmentioned.  It couldn’t be stranger — or sadder.

Since late June 2014, the “surge” of those thousands of desperate children entering this country has been in the news.  Sensational stories were followed by fervent demonstrations and counter-demonstrations with emotions running high.  And it’s not a debate that stayed near the southern border either.  In my home state, Massachusetts, Governor Deval Patrick tearfully offered to detain some of the children — and that was somehow turned into a humanitarian gesture that liberals applauded and anti-immigrant activists decried.  Meanwhile the mayor of Lynn, a city north of Boston, echoed nativists on the border, announcing that her town didn’t want any more immigrants.  The months of this sort of emotion, partisanship, and one-upmanship have, however, diverted attention from the real issues.  As so often is the case, there is so much more to the story than what we’ve been hearing in the news.

Click here to read more of this dispatch.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Kansas Representative Mike Pompeo Blames all Problems on Senate, Democrats and US President–ARE YOU BUYING THAT, AMERICANS?


DON’T RE-ELECT POMPEO, KANSAS!!! He is a disgrace.–kas

Greetings,

     Congress can’t work for you without both chambers, the House and the Senate, working together. The House has passed over 350 bills and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid won’t even give them a vote.

     These include 40 bills directly related to job creation, growth, or retention. Many of these were supported by both Democrats and Republicans in the House. Some of these important bills specifically help the more than 3.4 million workers between the ages of 20 and 59 missing from our labor force. We’ve worked hard in the House to provide solutions. It’s a shame that the Senator Reid is fighting against these economic growth engines.


The House has offered bipartisan bills to move forward on job-creating projects like the Keystone XL Pipeline. But the Senate won’t give them a vote.

     If you ask Senator Reid or even President Obama about it, they would claim that the bills we have passed in the House are too radical and not serious enough for consideration. That is far from the truth. The vast majority of these bills were passed with massive bipartisan support, including over two thirds of all House members, to improve the lives of every American looking for work. If these bills were so radical, voting them down in the Senate would be very simple. Sen. Reid simply doesn’t want to hold votes that lead to a break in his ranks, or that undermine support for the President and his policies.

     One of these bills is my own H.R. 1900, the Natural Gas Pipeline Permitting Reform Act. It simply asks federal bureaucrats to approve or deny natural gas permit applications within one year–hardly a radical proposal when all it does is ask federal employees to do their job. This bill would lower the cost of heating and cooling homes for nearly every American and provide countless manufacturing jobs all across the country. We’ve offered real jobs bills that provide relief to families and small businesses that are willing to do the hard work of growing our economy. Yet the Senate has done nothing.

     During the government shutdown, the House worked tirelessly, passing eight bills to restore vital parts of the government while a deal got hammered out. Yet as Heritage Action’s Dan Holler pointed out at TownHall.com, the Senate passed zero.

     When you hear stories about a “dysfunctional legislature” or a “do-nothing Congress,” keep in mind that the House is holding votes regularly, passing pro-growth legislation, and listening to the American people. We just need leadership in the Senate to do the same.

Sincerely,

Mike Pompeo
Member of Congress

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Kansas Representative Mike Pompeo Blames all Problems on Senate, Democrats and US President–ARE YOU BUYING THAT, AMERICANS?


DON’T RE-ELECT POMPEO, KANSAS!!! He is a disgrace.–kas

Greetings,

     Congress can’t work for you without both chambers, the House and the Senate, working together. The House has passed over 350 bills and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid won’t even give them a vote.

     These include 40 bills directly related to job creation, growth, or retention. Many of these were supported by both Democrats and Republicans in the House. Some of these important bills specifically help the more than 3.4 million workers between the ages of 20 and 59 missing from our labor force. We’ve worked hard in the House to provide solutions. It’s a shame that the Senator Reid is fighting against these economic growth engines.


The House has offered bipartisan bills to move forward on job-creating projects like the Keystone XL Pipeline. But the Senate won’t give them a vote.

     If you ask Senator Reid or even President Obama about it, they would claim that the bills we have passed in the House are too radical and not serious enough for consideration. That is far from the truth. The vast majority of these bills were passed with massive bipartisan support, including over two thirds of all House members, to improve the lives of every American looking for work. If these bills were so radical, voting them down in the Senate would be very simple. Sen. Reid simply doesn’t want to hold votes that lead to a break in his ranks, or that undermine support for the President and his policies.

     One of these bills is my own H.R. 1900, the Natural Gas Pipeline Permitting Reform Act. It simply asks federal bureaucrats to approve or deny natural gas permit applications within one year–hardly a radical proposal when all it does is ask federal employees to do their job. This bill would lower the cost of heating and cooling homes for nearly every American and provide countless manufacturing jobs all across the country. We’ve offered real jobs bills that provide relief to families and small businesses that are willing to do the hard work of growing our economy. Yet the Senate has done nothing.

     During the government shutdown, the House worked tirelessly, passing eight bills to restore vital parts of the government while a deal got hammered out. Yet as Heritage Action’s Dan Holler pointed out at TownHall.com, the Senate passed zero.

     When you hear stories about a “dysfunctional legislature” or a “do-nothing Congress,” keep in mind that the House is holding votes regularly, passing pro-growth legislation, and listening to the American people. We just need leadership in the Senate to do the same.

Sincerely,

Mike Pompeo
Member of Congress

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Can Satan Delay a Message from Heaven?


 

3 God Promises to Beat the Back to School Blues

New blog from Doug Hutchcraft

The pools are empty. The cafeteria’s full. And Wal-Mart is selling pencils by the ton. Yep, it’s already the start of a new school year.

If you’re like millions of other parents, you maybe worry a little more sending this generation of kids to school. School seems a little meaner these days. Temptations rear their ugly head earlier and earlier. It can be a jungle out there!

 

Join the Conversation

Well our mail came today, and yesterday, and the day before yesterday. Big deal, right? It comes most days. It’s a big deal. Yeah, the post office has this
motto and they try their best to follow through on it. It’s a promise to keep, and it’s not an easy one. You know, “Neither rain nor sleet nor snow nor
darkness of night shall stay these couriers from their appointed rounds.” Things that need to get through to you usually do. And these people do their best
to keep their promise to get it there no matter what’s in the way.

I’m Ron Hutchcraft and I want to have A Word With You today about “What’s Keeping the Courier?”

Our word for today from the Word of God comes from Daniel 10. The Bible occasionally pulls the curtain back and gives us a peek at what’s going on in the
spiritual world that surrounds our own. There’s this unseen realm of spiritual battles between the forces of God and the forces of darkness. It’s a realm
we can’t see, but it’s affecting our everyday lives.

Well, in this instance, Daniel knew that God had a message; a vision for him that was to be proclaimed to his generation and to ours through the Scripture
that he wrote. But it wasn’t coming. Verse 2, “At that time, I Daniel, mourned for three weeks. I ate no choice food, no meat or wine touched my lips. I
used no lotions at all until the three weeks were over. Then on the twenty-fourth day of the first month as I was standing on the bank of the great river,
I looked up and there before me was a man dressed in linen with a belt of the finest gold around his waist.” And the Bible goes on to describe this
magnificent, angelic figure.

In verse 12 that figure says, “Do not be afraid, Daniel. Since the first day you set your mind to gain understanding and to humble yourself before your
God, your words were heard, and I have come in response to them.” Okay, then what was the delay? He says, “The prince of the Persian Kingdom resisted me 21
days. Then Michael, one of the chief princes came to help me because I was detained there with the King of Persia.” It’s a pretty extraordinary passage.
“Now I have come to explain to you what will happen to your people in the future, for the vision concerns a time yet to come.”

Okay, here’s what’s going on here. Daniel prayed for the message he needed. God, according to the angel, granted that immediately, gave it to His courier
angel to deliver.

And a messenger from hell, referred to here as the prince of the Persian Kingdom, battled the messenger from heaven to keep him from delivering it. So God
sent reinforcements and Satan’s grip was broken.

You know what made the difference? Apparently it was because Daniel used supernatural weapons to get his answer, not even knowing the unseen forces who
were fighting over it. What does this have to do with you and me right now? Well, it may explain what’s happened to your answer to prayer. Why something
God wants you to have has not yet been delivered. Because the Devil may be determined to stay God’s courier from delivering what God has already granted to
you.

Now, we can’t see. We probably shouldn’t even try to guess what’s happening in the war between God’s angels and hell’s hinderers. But we should learn from
Daniel what our part is in the battle: intense, focused, relentless, sacrificial prayer and fasting as God leads us, to focus just on God and His power.
Honestly, sometimes we have to break the hindering hold of Satan and only prayer can do that.

So if you sense that it’s time for a breakthrough in your church, or in your life, or in your family, commit yourself to a season of extraordinary prayer.
Because, as Jesus promised in Matthew 18:18, “Whatever you bind on earth will be bound in heaven, and whatever you loose on earth will be loosed in
heaven.” Although Satan is our primary enemy, don’t focus your praying on him. No, you focus on the Lord, Jesus Christ, the power of His name, the power of
His shed blood, and the power of His resurrection. We are in this battle together with Him.

And remember, for those who wage war under the banner of Jesus and His death on the cross, nothing can stay God’s couriers from their appointed rounds.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

People > Population growth rate: Countries Compared


The world took 454 years to go from a population of 345 million in 1310 AD to a billion by 1655 but only 344 years to reach 6 billion by 1999. While China remains the most populous country, its population growth rate has actually fallen to 0.9% far below the global average of 1.2% and the Asian average of 1.3%. Yet, five Asian countries — Bangladesh, China, India, Indonesia and Pakistan — are projected to account for nearly 45% of the world’s projected population growth between 2002 and 2050. India is expected to have a population count of 1.9 billion by 2015.

The world’s population is expected to cross 9 billion by 2050 and 10 billion by the turn of the century, the developing countries accounting for the bulk of the growth.

Posted at : http://www.nationmaster.com/country-info/stats/People/Population-growth-rate

by Suchita, Staff Editor
 
DEFINITION: The average annual percent change in the population, resulting from a surplus (or deficit) of births over deaths and the balance of migrants entering and leaving a country. The rate may be positive or negative. The growth rate is a factor in determining how great a burden would be imposed on a country by the changing needs of its people for infrastructure (e.g., schools, hospitals, housing, roads), resources (e.g., food, water, electricity), and jobs. Rapid population growth can be seen as threatening by neighboring countries.
 
#
COUNTRY
AMOUNT
DATE
GRAPH
HISTORY
1 Libya 4.85% 2013    
2 Zimbabwe 4.38% 2013    
3 South Sudan 4.23% 2013    
4 Qatar 4.19% 2013    
5 Uganda 3.32% 2013    
6 Niger 3.32% 2013    
7 Burundi 3.08% 2013    
8 Burkina Faso 3.06% 2013    
9 Gaza Strip 3.01% 2013    
10 Mali 3.01% 2013    
11 Western Sahara 2.96% 2013    
12 Ethiopia 2.9% 2013    
13 Zambia 2.89% 2013    
14 Turks and Caicos Islands 2.87% 2013    
15 United Arab Emirates 2.87% 2013    
16 Congo, Republic of the 2.86% 2013    
17 Benin 2.84% 2013    
18 Tanzania 2.82% 2013    
19 Angola 2.78% 2013    
20 Malawi 2.74% 2013    
21 Togo 2.73% 2013    
22 Rwanda 2.7% 2013    
23 Gambia 2.7% 2007    
24 Madagascar 2.65% 2013    
25 Guinea 2.64% 2013    
26 Equatorial Guinea 2.58% 2013    
27 Bahrain 2.57% 2013    
28 Liberia 2.56% 2013    
29 Nigeria 2.54% 2013    
30 Democratic Republic of the Congo 2.54% 2013    
31 Senegal 2.51% 2013    
32 Yemen 2.5% 2013    
  OPEC countries average 2.49% 2013    
33 East Timor 2.47% 2013    
34 Mozambique 2.44% 2013    
35 British Virgin Islands 2.4% 2013    
36 Eritrea 2.36% 2013    
  failed states average 2.34% 2013    
37 Sierra Leone 2.3% 2013    
38 Mauritania 2.29% 2013    
39 The Gambia 2.29% 2013    
40 Iraq 2.29% 2013    
41 Kenya 2.27% 2013    
  Sub-Saharan Africa average 2.27% 2013    
42 Djibouti 2.26% 2013    
43 Afghanistan 2.25% 2013    
44 Ghana 2.19% 2013    
45 Cayman Islands 2.19% 2013    
46 Central African Republic 2.14% 2013    
47 Solomon Islands 2.12% 2013    
48 Anguilla 2.11% 2013    
49 Vanuatu 2.06% 2013    
50 Oman 2.06% 2013    
51 Cameroon 2.04% 2013    
52 West Bank 2.03% 2013    
53 Cote d’Ivoire 2% 2013    
54 Belize 1.97% 2013    
55 Comoros 1.97% 2013    
  Former French colonies average 1.97% 2013    
56 French Guiana 1.96% 2006    
57 Gabon 1.96% 2013    
58 Singapore 1.96% 2013    
59 Chad 1.95% 2013    
60 Guinea-Bissau 1.95% 2013    
61 Sao Tome and Principe 1.94% 2013    
62 Guatemala 1.91% 2013    
63 Algeria 1.9% 2013    
64 Papua New Guinea 1.89% 2013    
65 Egypt 1.88% 2013    
  Middle Eastern and North Africa average 1.85% 2013    
66 Philippines 1.84% 2013    
67 Sudan 1.83% 2013    
  Muslim countries average 1.81% 2013    
68 Nepal 1.81% 2013    
69 Tajikistan 1.79% 2013    
70 Marshall Islands 1.79% 2013    
71 Kuwait 1.79% 2013    
72 Honduras 1.79% 2013    
73 Cambodia 1.67% 2013    
74 Somalia 1.67% 2013    
75 Brunei 1.67% 2013    
76 Bolivia 1.63% 2013    
77 Laos 1.63% 2013    
78 Bangladesh 1.59% 2013    
  Hot countries average 1.59% 2013    
  South Asia average 1.56% 2013    
79 Mayotte 1.53% 2011    
  Sparsely populated countries average 1.53% 2013    
80 Pakistan 1.52% 2013    
81 Cyprus 1.52% 2013    
82 Malaysia 1.51% 2013    
83 Saudi Arabia 1.51% 2013    
  Former British colonies average 1.5% 2013    
84 Israel 1.5% 2013    
  Landlocked countries average 1.46% 2013    
85 New Caledonia 1.45% 2013    
86 Venezuela 1.44% 2013    
87 Mongolia 1.44% 2013    
88 Cape Verde 1.41% 2013    
89 Ecuador 1.4% 2013    
90 Aruba 1.39% 2013    
91 Panama 1.38% 2013    
92 Botswana 1.35% 2013    
93 Reunion 1.34% 2006    
  Former Spanish colonies average 1.29% 2013    
94 Dominican Republic 1.28% 2013    
95 India 1.28% 2013    
96 Costa Rica 1.27% 2013    
  South and Central Asia average 1.26% 2013    
97 Antigua and Barbuda 1.26% 2013    
98 Iran 1.24% 2013    
99 Paraguay 1.23% 2013    
100 Kiribati 1.21% 2013    
101 Kazakhstan 1.2% 2013    
102 Swaziland 1.17% 2013    
103 Turkey 1.16% 2013    
104 Ireland 1.16% 2013    
105 Turkmenistan 1.15% 2013    
106 Suriname 1.15% 2013    
107 Bhutan 1.15% 2013    
  Religious countries average 1.14% 2013    
108 Luxembourg 1.13% 2013    
109 Christmas Island 1.12% 2013    
110 Australia 1.11% 2013    
111 Colombia 1.1% 2013    
112 Mexico 1.07% 2013    
  East Asia and Pacific average 1.06% 2013    
113 Nicaragua 1.05% 2013    
114 Burma 1.05% 2013    
115 Morocco 1.04% 2013    
  Catholic countries average 1.04% 2013    
116 Vietnam 1.03% 2013    
117 Azerbaijan 1.01% 2013    
118 Peru 1% 2013    
119 French Polynesia 1% 2013    
120 Indonesia 0.99% 2013    
121 Haiti 0.99% 2013    
122 Argentina 0.98% 2013    
123 Kyrgyzstan 0.97% 2013    
  Christian countries average 0.953% 2013    
124 Tunisia 0.95% 2013    
125 Uzbekistan 0.94% 2013    
126 San Marino 0.93% 2013    
  Latin America and Caribbean average 0.927% 2013    
127 United States 0.9% 2013    
128 Seychelles 0.9% 2013    
129 The Bahamas 0.89% 2013    
130 Sri Lanka 0.89% 2013    
131 Guadeloupe 0.88% 2006    
132 Chile 0.86% 2013    
133 New Zealand 0.85% 2013    
134 Macau 0.85% 2013    
135 Switzerland 0.85% 2013    
136 Isle of Man 0.84% 2013    
137 Brazil 0.83% 2013    
  Tourist destinations average 0.827% 2013    
  Heavily indebted countries average 0.826% 2013    
138 Jersey 0.82% 2013    
  Densely populated countries average 0.814% 2013    
139 Liechtenstein 0.81% 2013    
140 Saint Kitts and Nevis 0.8% 2013    
141 Canada 0.77% 2013    
142 Tuvalu 0.77% 2013    
143 Netherlands Antilles 0.754% 2008    
144 Namibia 0.75% 2013    
145 Fiji 0.73% 2013    
146 Spain 0.73% 2013    
147 Martinique 0.72% 2006    
148 Jamaica 0.7% 2013    
149 Mauritius 0.68% 2013    
150 Iceland 0.66% 2013    
151 Samoa 0.59% 2013    
152 Nauru 0.58% 2013    
153 United Kingdom 0.55% 2013    
154 Bermuda 0.55% 2013    
155 North Korea 0.53% 2013    
  Non-religious countries average 0.522% 2013    
156 Thailand 0.52% 2013    
157 Grenada 0.52% 2013    
  Western Europe average 0.503% 2013    
  Emerging markets average 0.502% 2013    
158 Montserrat 0.48% 2013    
  Southern Europe average 0.479% 2013    
159 France 0.47% 2013    
160 Faroe Islands 0.47% 2013    
161 China 0.46% 2013    
162 Netherlands 0.44% 2013    
  High income OECD countries average 0.395% 2013    
  Group of 7 countries (G7) average 0.391% 2013    
163 Hong Kong 0.39% 2013    
164 Guernsey 0.38% 2013    
165 Saint Helena 0.377% 2011    
166 Palau 0.37% 2013    
167 Saint Lucia 0.36% 2013    
168 Wallis and Futuna 0.35% 2013    
  Cold countries average 0.341% 2013    
169 Barbados 0.34% 2013    
170 Italy 0.34% 2013    
171 Guam 0.34% 2013    
172 Lesotho 0.34% 2013    
173 Malta 0.34% 2013    
174 Norway 0.33% 2013    
175 Saint Helena, Ascension, and Tristan da Cunha 0.3% 2013    
176 El Salvador 0.29% 2013    
177 Albania 0.29% 2013    
  Eurozone average 0.271% 2013    
178 Taiwan 0.27% 2013    
179 Gibraltar 0.26% 2013    
180 Uruguay 0.25% 2013    
  Former Soviet republics average 0.231% 2013    
181 Denmark 0.23% 2013    
182 Dominica 0.22% 2013    
183 Andorra 0.22% 2013    
184 Republic of Macedonia 0.22% 2013    
185 South Korea 0.18% 2013    
186 Sweden 0.18% 2013    
  Potential Future EU Members average 0.173% 2013    
187 Portugal 0.15% 2013    
188 Syria 0.15% 2013    
  Europe average 0.148% 2013    
  NATO countries average 0.143% 2013    
189 Jordan 0.14% 2013    
190 Armenia 0.14% 2013    
191 Tonga 0.14% 2013    
  European Union average 0.14% 2013    
192 European Union 0.098% 2010    
193 Slovakia 0.09% 2013    
194 Northern Mariana Islands 0.09% 2013    
195 Finland 0.06% 2013    
196 Belgium 0.05% 2013    
197 Greece 0.04% 2013    
198 Greenland 0.03% 2013    
199 Austria 0.02% 2013    
200 Falkland Islands (Islas Malvinas) 0.011% 2009    
201 Norfolk Island 0.01% 2013    
202 Cocos (Keeling) Islands 0.0 2013    
203 Holy See (Vatican City) 0.0 2013    
204 Monaco 0.0 2013    
205 Pitcairn Islands 0.0 2013    
206 Tokelau -0.01% 2013    
207 Russia -0.02% 2013    
208 Svalbard -0.03% 2013    
209 Niue -0.03% 2013    
210 Lebanon -0.04% 2013    
211 Trinidad and Tobago -0.09% 2013    
212 Poland -0.09% 2013    
213 Bosnia and Herzegovina -0.1% 2013    
214 Japan -0.1% 2013    
215 Maldives -0.11% 2013    
216 Croatia -0.11% 2013    
217 Cuba -0.13% 2013    
218 Czech Republic -0.15% 2013    
219 Belarus -0.18% 2013    
220 Germany -0.19% 2013    
  Eastern Europe average -0.19% 2013    
221 Hungary -0.2% 2013    
222 Slovenia -0.21% 2013    
223 Guyana -0.21% 2013    
224 Romania -0.27% 2013    
225 Lithuania -0.28% 2013    
226 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines -0.3% 2013    
227 Georgia -0.33% 2013    
228 Federated States of Micronesia -0.38% 2013    
229 American Samoa -0.4% 2013    
230 South Africa -0.45% 2013    
231 Serbia -0.46% 2013    
232 Serbia and Montenegro -0.467% 2011    
233 Puerto Rico -0.47% 2013    
234 Virgin Islands -0.53% 2013    
235 Montenegro -0.56% 2013    
236 Latvia -0.61% 2013    
237 Ukraine -0.63% 2013    
238 Estonia -0.66% 2013    
239 Bulgaria -0.81% 2013    
240 Saint Pierre and Miquelon -1.01% 2013    
241 Moldova -1.02% 2013    
242 Cook Islands -3.07% 2013    
Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment