Even if John Stewart is Gone, We all Need to Keep taking on FOX and all the Media


I am going to put a lot of John Stewart videos in the comment section, like this one:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YO_om3iK9kE

You probably heard the great news – after a few years of progressive activism, FOX finally cancelled Glenn Beck’s show–but the Boycott Must Go On!!

Ten years ago, Media Matters launched with a revolutionary mission: to systematically monitor the U.S. media for conservative misinformation every day, in real time. We’ve been calling out right-wing lies for a decade — and we’re not done yet. Will you contribute now to help us raise $10,000 for our 10th anniversary?

Media Matters Timeline

For ten years, we’ve successfully fought back against the bad actors that poison our media with right-wing lies and smears. It’s been an amazing beginning, and we couldn’t have done it without your support.

We’re in this for the long haul. Make an anniversary gift today to kickstart the next ten years of media accountability.

Dear Kevin,
You probably heard the great news – after two years of progressive activism, FOX finally cancelled Glenn Beck’s show.
Beck was targeted after he slandered President Obama by saying, “This president has exposed himself as a guy, over and over and over again, who has a deep-seated hatred for white people, or the white culture, I don’t know what it is… This guy, I believe, is a racist.”
Activists at ColorOfChange, Media Matters, StopBeck, FoxNewsBoycott, and of course Democrats.com responded with a boycott of advertisers on Glenn Beck’s show. Ultimately over 300 advertisers pulled their ads from Beck, costing FOX over $40 million.
Advertiser boycotts work! And it’s time to boycott all FOX News advertisers:
http://www.democrats.com/boycott-proactiv
We’re starting our boycott of all FOX News with Proactiv, which sells acne medicine to teenagers and young adults. Why?
First, there are lots of other acne treatments. Second, young adults above all are hurt by FOX News, which promotes right-wing policies on race, education, healthcare, the environment, and war. Let’s get our future leaders to lead the fight against FOX News!
Sign the petition to Proactiv and enter the email address of every young adult over 18 you know:
http://www.democrats.com/boycott-proactiv
Beyond President Obama, FOX regularly slanders nearly everyone: Democrats, unionized workers, the unemployed (including veterans and 99ers), environmentalists, feminists, blacks, Hiics, Jews, Muslims, progressives, scientists, and any other group it disagrees with.
FOX News broadcasts rightwing extremist slander, incitement to violence, political propaganda, and outright lies to promote its rightwing political agenda. This is not “news,” but rather a never-ending “war on news” – and it’s all documented in our petition.
Why would any decent company want to fund it? Tell Proactiv to stop advertising on FOX News:
http://www.democrats.com/boycott-proactiv
Thanks for all you do!
Bob Fertik

GLEN BECK ADMITTED in 2007, “I Am RACIST and Barack Obama is very White” THIS MAKES Boycotting FOX NEWS needed NOW

By Kevin Stoda

Dear, American supporters of the Fascist Oddball Xenophobic (FOX) news networks.

AMERICANS are getting less tolerant of your racism and stronghold on our major media.

For example, we have noted that in his 2007 TV program from FOX (See on You-Tube), Glen Beck admitted he himself was racist. Further, Beck then, in contrast to 2009, called Barrack Obama much more white than black. (Apparently, Beck now he has other nonsense to mush men’s minds.)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n0tgvWxC_6A

Using a major news platform to promote racism and to tell people to disrespect a whole presidential administration through mixed truths, outright lies, and xenophobia, is not to be tolerated any more.

On Democracy Now today, Amy Goodman asked Benjamin Jealous of the NAACP what he thought of Wal-Mart’s pull-out from advertising on the Glen Beck program on FOX.

NOTE: Goodman had simply asked , “The whole attack by Glenn Beck that drove this (resignation)? In your response from the NAACP to Van Jones, it says, ´The only thing more outrageous than Mr. Beck’s attack on Van Jones is the fact that there are sponsors that continue to pay him to provide this type of offensive commentary.` Do you support the continued boycott of companies like Wal-Mart of Beck’s show on Fox?”

http://www.democracynow.org/2009/9/8/white_house_environmental_adviser_van_jones

This is a particularly important point because Glen Beck´s HATE CAMPAIGN ON THE OBAMA ADMINISTRATION led recently to a great American policy maker, Van Jones, quitting the government this week.

http://thinkprogress.org/2009/09/06/van-jones-resigns/

Mr. Jealous said, “We certainly support them (Walmart) choosing with their dollars who they’re going to support. I mean, it’s—Glenn Beck is somebody who’s told a seven-year-old girl, a seven-year-old black girl, that he would buy her a ticket back to Africa, that she needed to go back to Africa. And then he comes out, and he says that healthcare is the beginning of reparations. I mean, this guy plays the race card on a weekly basis. He does it very aggressive—you know, in a very hateful way.”

Recall, first, that Van Jones is one of the most important and thoughtful men in America—however, the FOX (Fascist Oddball Xenophobic) news network chose to support a man, like Glen Beck, rather than seeing that tens of millions of Americans need to get health care from promoters like Jones and that our America economy needs to move starting today to the kind of economy that its competitors worldwide are already doing.

http://www.alternet.org/environment/95963/what_will_the_green_economy_look_like/

Let’s quote the wisdom and influential words of Van Jones on the absolute necessity to green the American economy NOW!

“I think it’s really important to point out that we’re sort of at the end of an era of American capitalism, where we thought we could run the economy based on consumption rather than production, credit rather than creativity, borrowing rather than building, and also, most importantly, environmental destruction rather than environmental restoration.”

Jones continued, “We’re trying to make the case in this book that that era is over. We now have to move in a very different direction. And key to that will be basing the US economy not on credit cards, but based on clean energy and the clean energy revolution that would put literally millions of people to work, putting up solar panels all across the United States, weatherizing buildings so they don’t leak so much energy and put up so much carbon, building wind farms and wave farms, manufacturing wind turbines. We argue you could put Detroit back to work not making SUVs to destroy the world, but making wind turbines, 8,000 finely machine parts in each one, twenty tons of steel in each wind tower, making wind turbines to help save the world.”

Finally, Van Jones wisely noted, “So we think that you can fight pollution and poverty at the same time. We think that you can actually power our way through this recession by putting people to work, but we’re going to have to start building things here and re-powering, retrofitting, retooling America, and that that’s the way forward both for the economy, for the earth and for everyday people.”

Note: These statements came from a program on DN from October of last year:

http://www.democracynow.org/2008/10/28/van_jones_on_the_green_collar

Van Beck has written a book of the same title, The Green Collar Economy: How One Solution Can Fix Our Two Biggest Problems.

http://www.harpercollins.com/books/9780061650758/The_Green_Collar_Economy/index.aspx

America needs such voices as Van Jones in government leadership in America—not Fascist Oddball Xenophobic (FOX) types.

Clean up the American airwaves of all its fascism and racism, today.

http://www.pittsburghurbanmedia.com/a-petition-against-fox-conservative-host-glenn-beck.aspx

NOTE: One way to change the noise of Fascist Oddball Xenophobic (FOX) media moguls is to support alternative media organizations

http://aan.org/alternative/Aan/index

and alternative monitoring websites.

http://americas.mediamonitors.net/content/view/full/64380

Another way, is to demand that local radio and TV channels put better programming on, such as Democracy Now or news sources promoted by serious progressive journalists:

http://www.tacomapjh.org/progressive_news.htm

Posted in Uncategorized | 55 Comments

American Citizens Tell About How Erdogan’s Turkish Forces took over the streets of DC and Almost Killed Them–and USA did nothing


“I Could Have Died”: Protesters Detail Violent Attack by Turkish President Erdogan’s Guards in D.C.

STORYMAY 22, 2017

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TOPICS

GUESTS
Seyid Riza Dersimi

Turkish-American protester who was injured at the peaceful protest outside the Turkish ambassador’s residence in Washington on Tuesday.

Ruken Isik

Kurdish activist and Ph.D. student at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. Her new piece for The Huffington Post is titled “Will Erdogan’s Thugs Face No Consequences for Attacking Us on U.S. Soil?”


Image Credit: Baltimore Bloc

Last week Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s security detail assaulted a group of peaceful protesters outside the Turkish ambassador’s residence. Video from the scene shows Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan looking on during the assault. It’s not clear if Erdogan gave the order for the attack. The assault came shortly after Erdogan was welcomed to the White House by President Trump. For more, we speak with Seyid Riza Dersimi, who was violently attacked during the protest and rushed by ambulance to the hospital, where he received stitches on his nose and was treated for a head injury. We also speak with Ruken Isik, a Kurdish activist and Ph.D. student at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. She attended last week’s protest and wrote a piece for The Huffington Post titled “Will Erdogan’s Thugs Face No Consequences for Attacking Us on U.S. Soil?”


TRANSCRIPT
This is a rush transcript. Copy may not be in its final form.

AMY GOODMAN: We end today’s show looking at Turkey’s crackdown on protest—not in Ankara or Istanbul, but here in the U.S. Last week, the Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s security detail assaulted a group of peaceful protesters outside the Turkish ambassador’s residence. Video from the scene shows Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan looking during the assault. It is not clear if he gave the order for the attack. Among those assaulted by the Turkish security detail were American diplomatic security officers. Police briefly detained the assailants, but released them after learning they held diplomatic immunity.

The assault came shortly after Erdogan was welcomed to the White House by President Trump. During the meeting, Trump did not mention Turkey’s deteriorating human rights situation, which has seen nearly 50,000 people and 150 journalists arrested since a failed coup last summer. On Sunday, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson denounced the violent clash during an interview with Fox News Sunday’s Chris Wallace.

SECRETARY OF STATE REX TILLERSON: We did call the ambassador of Turkey into the State Department to discuss what occurred with them and express our view that this is simply unacceptable. There is an ongoing investigation, Chris, and I think we’ll wait and see what the outcome of that investigation is. But we have expressed our dismay at what occurred at the Turkish Embassy.

AMY GOODMAN: Well, for more, we go to Washington, D.C., where we’re joined by two guests, both eyewitnesses to last week’s violence outside the Turkish ambassador’s residence.

Seyid Riza Dersimi was violently attacked during the protest, rushed by ambulance to the hospital, where he received stitches on his nose, was treated for a head injury. His assailants knocked out one of his teeth and loosened several others. Dersimi is a businessman who’s been a U.S. citizen since 1992.

And we’re joined by Ruken Isik, a Kurdish activist, Ph.D. student at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. She attended last week’s protest and wrote a piece for The Huffington Post that was headlined “Will Erdogan’s Thugs Face No Consequences for Attacking Us on U.S. Soil?”

I want to welcome you both to Democracy Now! Seyid Riza Dersimi, explain what happened to you. Tell us about the scene that day.

SEYID RIZA DERSIMI: Well, we went to—like 13, 14 of the citizens of American—we are American citizens. We went to Turkish ambassador’s house to protest Erdogan. We wanted to he hear our voice. We are not happy the way he—his dictatorship. And as soon as we get there, the police—we just followed the D.C. police orders. And the D.C. police sent us across the street. And when we were there, right away, the people in front of the Turkish ambassador’s house, they start to curse us. They start to use F-words. And then we—our slogan was very peaceful. It’s not violent whatsoever. We were demanding peace in Turkey. And we were—this is our slogans. Erdogan is a baby killer. ISIS and Erdogan is the same. ISIS is made in Turkey. Please, Mr. President Trump, stop Erdogan, because Erdogan is killing, attacking the Kurds. Kurds fights ISIS, against ISIS. And the Turks fight Kurds. So, we wanted to Erdogan hear our voice. That was the reason we were there.

But 10—10, 15 minutes later, and first they attacked, and then the police stopped them. Some civilian they attacked, and police stopped them. And then, like five, 10 minutes later, the Erdogan bodyguards, they passed the police, their block, and then they attacked us, very barbaric way. And first I remember there was a woman next to me, Lusik. She’s a Yazidi represent in Washington. They attack her. They—one of them just grabbed her head and started punching, and I tried to cover her head. And then, all of a sudden, three or four of them attacked on me, and I found myself on the street. And then they were kicking, one after another, my head. I tried to get up, but they were kicking me, so I realized that I cannot. And I laid down on the floor, and I tried to cover my head with my arm. And I could have died. I don’t know how long I stayed there. I lost it. And then—and then, all of a sudden, I realized no one around me, and I tried to get up, and I saw I was bleeding. And then some police officers, they came, and they raised me up, and they moved me towards the circle.

AMY GOODMAN: I wanted to ask Ruken Isik: What did you see at that site on Tuesday in front of the Turkish ambassador’s house?

RUKEN ISIK: Well, I was actually—I arrived like five minutes later, from—there were two attacks. The first one happened when I already arrived there. It was like five minutes after that. And my friend’s daughter, 7 years old, Shayan [phon.], was like—she was crying when she saw me. I took her, and then, with my son, 4-years-old son, I took them to the like—we were like six feet behind the 10 people. And I was trying to soothe her.

All of a sudden, I saw these men in black suit, they were just like—they were rushing into my friends. And at first I thought, “No, they will not come to attack us. Police will stop them.” But then I saw like they furthered, and then they came close to me. They couldn’t grab me, but they grabbed one of my friends. You might have seen her pics, photos, in media. He was like—he was put on a [inaudible] leg position.

And I was—even though I felt very guilty after that, because I couldn’t protect her, because I had my kid with me, 4-years-old son. And I’ve been saying that I was there with my son, because we’ve been to the protests in D.C. like for a long time. I’ve been here like for 10 years. And I take him to every protest. It is because we never got involved in any violence. And it is just usual for the Kurdish community here to take their kids. Even pregnant women, sometimes they come to the protest.

So, and I tried to—when I saw my friend was punched by one of these men in black suit, I tried to run away to the other—the opposite direction. And I saw that there was a door open, and it was—later I realized that it was the Kenyan Embassy. I asked them, “Can I come in?” They told me like, “You’ll be safe. The American police is here.” I said, “They couldn’t protect us.” First I thought they didn’t protect us, but then I—after watching the videos, no, actually, they couldn’t, because they’re outnumbered. And I think they had guns. The Erdogan’s bodyguards, they had guns. And I’m sure that the state police was startled, too. They couldn’t—they couldn’t do anything against them.

AMY GOODMAN: Who are these security? And, first off, Erdogan—video was released, newly published video, that shows Erdogan looking on as members of his security detail assault the group of peaceful protesters. What are you calling for now? And did you see Erdogan looking on?

RUKEN ISIK: Well, I didn’t see him, but like I wouldn’t be surprised if he gave the order, because, in Turkey, he is the—he is the person who is calling all the shots in Turkey. He is the—he is ruling everything, like he is in charge of everything in Turkey, not just the politics, but the judiciary. He is the head of the—head of the universities. He is everything in Turkey. So I wouldn’t be surprised if he gave the order.

AMY GOODMAN: He has just extended the state of emergency in Turkey on Sunday, Ruken Isik. And what are you calling for now? The men who were arrested apparently have diplomatic immunity, and so they were released. What are you demanding? On Fox, they asked Tillerson. Chris Wallace asked Tillerson if the U.S. would be expelling the Turkish ambassador, and Secretary of State Tillerson said there needs to be an investigation.

RUKEN ISIK: Well, I want to say that this is not the first time that his bodyguards are attacking protesters. This happened in Ecuador last year, and also it happened at the Brookings Institute in Washington, D.C., again, in 2016. Well, they—basically, they get away with that. And because of that, I guess they think that they can do whatever they want in other countries. They do that in Turkey. Like they even—so, like, I wanted to say that this violence that we witnessed on Tuesday, it is—we can take it as like—as a representation of the Turkish state violence against dissidents and opponents in Turkey. But the scale of it was so—the amount of the violence that we witnessed was nothing to be compared to the ones that people are having on a day-to-day basis in Turkey. So, yes, McCain called for the expulsion of the ambassador. I think they should do something, and especially this new government, especially Mr. Trump, the president. He is more patriotic. And this happened in American soil. So, I hope they will do something. And they need to do something, actually, like because they get away with that. They get away with the one in Ecuador the last year. That means that this is a recurring thing that’s happening.

AMY GOODMAN: Ruken, do you think that Trump’s position on Turkey, you know, calling—when Europe was condemning the referendum that Erdogan pushed through that would increase his dictatorial powers, do you think Trump is influenced by Mike Flynn, his former national security adviser, who turned out to be a paid foreign lobbyist for the Turkish government?

RUKEN ISIK: Well, actually, I—yeah, sorry.

AMY GOODMAN: Go ahead.

RUKEN ISIK: Is someone going—well, actually, they—basically, they have links with the Flynn, that we saw that, but I don’t—but Turkey stands against—Turkey is always like—they don’t want to upset Turkey. This is how I see it, because I think it’s a very important ally in the Middle East. And I don’t think that they will—they wanted to break their ties with Turkey.

AMY GOODMAN: And, Seyid, do you plan to protest Erdogan anymore, after you were brutally attacked and hospitalized?

SEYID RIZA DERSIMI: Absolutely, absolutely, whenever I have a chance. I am—I’m not going to give it up. As an American citizen, I have a right—it’s our First Amendment—to protest, to have a peaceful protest, whenever or wherever we want. Mr. Erdogan cannot take away this, my right, as a Kurdish from Turkey. This happens in Turkey, shouldn’t happen in Turkey, either. But as a—

AMY GOODMAN: We have five seconds.

SEYID RIZA DERSIMI: As an American, as an American citizen, it’s not acceptable. It is not acceptable.

AMY GOODMAN: Seyid Riza Dersimi, I want to thank you for being with us. And, Ruken Isik, Ph.D. student at University of Maryland, thanks so much for joining us. For people who are listening on the radio, you can watch the video at democracynow.org.

The original content of this program is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. Please attribute legal copies of this work to democracynow.org. Some of the work(s) that this program incorporates, however, may be separately licensed. For further information or additional permissions, contact us.

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Is Turkey Becoming a Dictatorship?: Erdogan Claims Victory in Vote to Give President Sweeping Powers

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The World needs more Moderates, like Merkel–not Nut-Jobs Like Trump or his Backers, America


As Iranian Voters Reject Hardliner, Trump Embraces Saudi Monarch & Vows to Isolate Iran

STORYMAY 22, 2017

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GUESTS
Trita Parsi

founder and president of the National Iranian American Council. He’s the author of the new book, Losing an Enemy: Obama, Iran, and the Triumph of Diplomacy, out next week. He’s also the author of A Single Roll of the Dice: Obama’s Diplomacy with Iran.

Medea Benjamin

co-founder of CodePink and author of the book Kingdom of the Unjust: Behind the U.S.-Saudi Connection.


President Trump vowed to isolate Iran during his major address to Gulf leaders in Saudi Arabia. He accused Iran of funding, arming and training militias and other extremist groups in region, while ignoring Saudi Arabia’s role in destabilizing the region. Trump’s remarks came just two days after Iranian President Hassan Rouhani was re-elected in a landslide vote Friday. Rouhani’s main challenger, hardline judge Ebrahim Raisi, received only 38 percent of the vote. For more on Trump’s trip to Saudi Arabia and Iran’s election, we speak with Trita Parsi, founder and president of the National Iranian American Council. He’s the author of the new book, “Losing an Enemy: Obama, Iran, and the Triumph of Diplomacy,” out next week.


TRANSCRIPT
This is a rush transcript. Copy may not be in its final form.

AMY GOODMAN: As we continue to cover President Trump’s trip to Saudi Arabia, I want to turn to his address to dozens of heads of state from across the Muslim world Sunday, when Trump was in Riyadh. Trump said they should unite in their fight against terrorism in a battle he characterized as between, quote, “good and evil.”

PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP: This is not a battle between different faiths, different sects or different civilizations. This is a battle between barbaric criminals, who seek to obliterate human life, and decent people, all in the name of religion, people that want to protect life and want to protect their religion. This is a battle between good and evil. But the nations of the Middle East cannot wait for American power to crush this enemy for them. The nations of the Middle East will have to decide what kind of future they want for themselves, for their country and, frankly, for their families and for their children. It’s a choice between two futures. And it is a choice America cannot make for you. A better future is only possible if your nations drive out the terrorists and drive out the extremists. Drive them out. Drive them out of your places of worship. Drive them out of your communities. Drive them out of your holy land. And drive them out of this Earth.

AMY GOODMAN: Donald Trump singled out Iran as a state sponsor of terrorism during his Riyadh speech. He called on all, quote, “nations of conscience” to isolate Iran.

PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP: Starving terrorists of their territory, of their funding and the false allure of the craven ideology, will be the basis for easily defeating them. But no discussion of stamping out this threat would be complete without mentioning the government that gives terrorists all three—safe harbor, financial backing and the social standing needed for recruitment. It is a regime that is responsible for so much instability in that region. I am speaking, of course, of Iran. From Lebanon to Iraq to Yemen, Iran funds, arms and trains terrorists, militias and other extremist groups that spread destruction and chaos across the region. For decades, Iran has fueled the fires of sectarian conflict and terror. It is a government that speaks openly of mass murder, vowing the destruction of Israel, death to America and ruin for many leaders in nations in this very room.

AMY GOODMAN: We’re joined now by Trita Parsi, founder and president of the National Iranian American Council, author of the new book, Losing an Enemy: Obama, Iran, and the [Triumph] of Diplomacy. Still with us, Medea Benjamin, co-founder of CodePink, author Kingdom of the Unjust: Behind the U.S.-Saudi Connection.

Trita Parsi, if you could respond to what President Trump said in this first foreign trip he has made, his first trip to his first country, Saudi Arabia?

TRITA PARSI: Well, I think it’s quite regrettable that right after the Iranian people went out, and, despite all of the undemocratic obstacles they had to overcome, they nevertheless managed to choose the most moderate person on the ballot, the person who had vowed to continue to try to open Iran up, to continue to negotiate to be able to resolve conflicts in the region, and actually wants a better relationship with the United States, Donald Trump’s response to this is to clench his fist and call for Iran’s isolation.

I think it’s also important to recognize that this is not just rhetoric. This is not just something that we can dismiss, mindful of the many things that Trump otherwise tends to say. Here, we’re seeing two building blocks being put into place that can lead to an absolute disaster. The combination of the policy of isolation and rejecting diplomacy, together with a policy of regime change—because in that speech he also called for regime change—is exactly how the Iraq War started. Late in the 1990s, Congress passed the Iraq Liberation Act, that made regime change in Iraq official policy. It was combined with an isolation policy. And all it needed was a spark in order for that to lead to a military confrontation. Donald Trump, perhaps not knowing so, is now laying the groundwork for that type of a conflict, at the request of the Saudis.

AMY GOODMAN: I wanted to get your comment on Rex Tillerson, the secretary of state, saying he hopes Rouhani’s re-election will mean a dismantling of Iran’s network of terrorists and the restoration of human rights. The significance of Tillerson—and, of course, President Trump—making these comments from Saudi Arabia?

TRITA PARSI: Well, it’s fascinating, because, on the one hand, the administration said that we’re not going to focus on human rights any longer. But when it comes to trying to find anything to attack Iran with, then of course it’s being thrown out there again. And for it to be said from Saudi Arabia, where the human rights situation is worse than it is in Iran, obviously is not helping the human rights situation in Iran. In fact, this is exactly what the hardliners in Iran would like. It is so easy for them to dismiss what otherwise is legitimate criticism against Iran’s human rights record, when it is said from Riyadh and when it’s said with this degree of hypocrisy and double standards. It’s actually undermining the human rights situation in Iran when it’s done in the manner that Rex Tillerson did it.

AMY GOODMAN: I’d like to turn to a 2009 diplomatic cable released by WikiLeaks on Saudi Arabia. The cable, which was written by then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, said, quote, “[D]onors in Saudi Arabia constitute the most significant source of funding to Sunni terrorist groups worldwide,” unquote. The cable went on to urge senior U.S. government officials to, quote, “encourage the Saudi government to take more steps to stem the flow of funds from Saudi Arabia-based sources to terrorists and extremists worldwide.” Trita Parsi?

TRITA PARSI: Well, this trip is not about fighting terrorism. If it was, we would have actually have seen much, much firmer position by the United States against these funders in Saudi Arabia, who actually also provided the seed funding for ISIS. Instead, all of the focus is on Iran. Why is that? Well, the reason for this is—beyond the fact that the Trump administration is securing these arms deals, is that there are elements in the Trump administration, and certainly people in Saudi Arabia and in Israel, who want the United States to once again adopt a position of hard hegemony in the Middle East. They want the United States to be completely responsible for the security of the Middle East, meaning that the United States will have to uphold it and pay for it through its own treasure and blood, at—which would obviously then benefit Israel and Saudi Arabia and some of those states that are allied with them. This puts the United States in direct confrontation with Iran, who opposes American hegemony in the region.

The question that is not being asked in Washington, D.C., is: What is the—if one were to assume that there is such a thing as a benefit of hegemony, what is the benefit of hegemony for the United States in a region this chaotic? What is the benefit of being responsible for the security of the Middle East when it is in such chaos? And what would the cost of that be? Those are questions that are not being asked. All the focus tends to be how many potential jobs $300 billion of arms sales will provide. Three hundred billion dollars of arms sales will only lead to further destabilizing the region, which then the United States would be responsible for. The cost-benefit analysis of this makes absolutely no sense, but the question is hardly discussed.

AMY GOODMAN: Trita, new Senate sanctions against Iran are scheduled to be marked up in committee this week. What is your message to Congress in the wake of the Iranian election?

TRITA PARSI: Well, as the Senate bill stands right now, it actually is a violation of the JCPOA, the Iran nuclear deal from 2015. And I think it would be highly problematic if members of Congress, particularly on the Democratic side, vote for this, arguing that this is not a deal breaker and something that would violate the JCPOA, and then, in combination with what Trump is doing right now, further would put us on a path towards a military confrontation with Iran. They don’t have the ability to say, “Well, we didn’t think this would lead to this,” as they could have said when they voted in favor of the Iraq Liberation Act or, later on, when they voted in favor of the Iraq War. It’s very clear what this bill will do as it stands right now. And I think the message to Congress from the American people has to be absolutely clear. They supported the nuclear deal. In fact, the nuclear deal is now more popular amongst the American public than it was two years ago, because they’ve seen that it actually works. And it would be a disaster if Congress, and particularly if Democrats, who fought so hard to save this deal, now actually pull the trigger and kill it.

AMY GOODMAN: And the people’s response in Iran to the election of Rouhani, what you think this means?

TRITA PARSI: Well, Iran is now one of the very few countries—certainly in the region, perhaps beyond the region—in which the population three times in a row have voted in the most moderate person that existed on the ballot. Very few countries in the region can say this. In fact, if you take a look at Israel, for instance, last time the moderates won a landslide in Israel was in 1992. And for them to now see the reaction by the United States to this election result, an election result that very much was about continuing the outreach to the West and continuing the outreach to the United States, is deeply disappointing, to say the least. I’ve spoken to a few people who felt that the jubilant mood after Rouhani’s victory suddenly took a turn for the worse once they heard Donald Trump’s speech in Riyadh.

AMY GOODMAN: And, Medea Benjamin, the ramping up of tension with Iran? And, of course, we see it with North Korea, as well. And President Trump, not that he was that different from President Obama—or was he?—when it came to Saudi Arabia? How many trips did President Obama make to the kingdom? Something like four trips.

MEDEA BENJAMIN: [inaudible] Obama not only traveled to Saudi Arabia, but authorized 42 different deals, totaling $115 billion. But on the other hand, he started, at the very end of his eight years, to reconsider, to pull back U.S. support for the Saudi bombing in Yemen, to put a halt on some of those weapons. And now Donald Trump is doing just the opposite.

But I want to say, Amy, that the people of the Middle East are desperate for solutions, and the people of the United States don’t support continued U.S. involvement in the wars in the Middle East. Donald Trump said he needed a good relationship with Russia to start dealing with the problems in places like Syria. Well, he also needs a good relationship with Iran. So I think our message should be that we need to stop the proxy wars between Saudi Arabia and Iran in the Middle East. We need the countries of the region to all come together. And Donald Trump should be focusing on finding solutions, not inflaming the tensions.

AMY GOODMAN: Well, Medea Benjamin, I want to thank you for being with us, co-founder of CodePink, author of Kingdom of the Unjust: Behind the U.S.-Saudi Connection. We’ll link to your piece, “10 Reasons Trump Should Not Strengthen U.S.-Saudi Ties.” And thank you to Trita Parsi, who is head of the National Iranian American Council, author of Losing an Enemy: Obama, Iran, and the [Triumph] of Diplomacy, which is out next week.

This is Democracy Now! When we come back, you may have seen the video of protesters, not in Turkey, but in Washington, D.C., being beaten by security guards, pummeled, kicked in the face, a number of them hospitalized. Well, we’ll talk about what happened and what will happen to the Turkish ambassador—some are calling for him to be expelled—and the U.S. relationship with Turkey, as it was shown that the Turkish president, visiting D.C. at the time, President Erdogan, looked on. Stay with us.

The original content of this program is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. Please attribute legal copies of this work to democracynow.org. Some of the work(s) that this program incorporates, however, may be separately licensed. For further information or additional permissions, contact us.

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“I Could Have Died”: Protesters Detail Violent Attack by Turkish President Erdogan’s Guards in D.C.

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TRUMP IS MAKING KSA MORE POWERFUL, WICKED AND DANGEROUS


AMY GOODMAN: And I wanted to go to another comment he made, going back to Donald Trump on the campaign trail, at a presidential debate in October, accusing the Clinton Foundation of being a criminal enterprise for taking millions of dollars from Saudi Arabia and other countries.

DONALD TRUMP: It’s a criminal enterprise, Saudi Arabia giving $25 million, Qatar, all of these countries. You talk about women and women’s rights? So, these are people that push gays off business—off buildings. These are people that kill women and treat women horribly. And yet you take their money. So I’d like to ask you right now: Why don’t you give back the money that you’ve taken from certain countries that treat certain groups of people so horribly? Why don’t you give back the money?

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Congress could stop Trump’s Illegal Deal with the Saudis Now


“It’s just appalling to see Trump in Saudi Arabia, Amy, touting this $110 billion arms deal, when you look at the history of how those arms have been used. You talked about their use in devastating Yemen. We also have the example of them crushing the democratic uprising in neighboring Bahrain, using those weapons to fund al-Qaeda groups in Iraq and in Syria, and using those weapons internally to crush dissent, particularly in the Shia areas, which is happening right now with the Saudi siege of the Shia town of Awamiyah, that is getting absolutely no press in the United States.”-MB

GUESTS
Medea Benjamin

co-founder of CodePink and author of the book Kingdom of the Unjust: Behind the U.S.-Saudi Connection.


AMY GOODMAN: The arms deal comes as the Pentagon continues to support a Saudi-led bombing campaign in Yemen, where years of fighting has decimated the country’s health, water, sewage and sanitation systems. Over 10,000 civilians have died since the Saudi invasion began in 2015. The U.N. says around 19 million of Yemen’s 28 million people need some form of aid, with many of them at risk of famine. Trump mentioned Yemen twice in his speech, but only to first praise the Saudis for their war against the Houthis and then to condemn Iran for its support of militant groups. The arms deal includes tanks, artillery, ships, helicopters, a missile defense system and cybersecurity technology. The deal also includes precision-guided munitions, which the Obama administration had stopped selling Saudi Arabia out of fear they would be used to bomb civilians in Yemen.

Democratic Senator Chris Murphy condemned the arms deal, writing in The Huffington Post, quote, “By selling the Saudis these precision-guided weapons more—not fewer—civilians will be killed because it is Saudi Arabia’s strategy to starve Yemenis to death to increase their own leverage at the negotiating table. They couldn’t do this without the weapons we are selling them,” he wrote.

Meanwhile, the human rights arm of the American Bar Association has informed the Senate the arms deal may be illegal due to the Saudi atrocities in Yemen. Vanderbilt University law professor Michael Newton wrote, quote, “Continued sale of arms to Saudi Arabia—and specifically of arms used in airstrikes—should not be presumed to be permissible,” unquote.

Meanwhile, in another deal reached over the weekend, the Saudi kingdom and the United Arab Emirates announced on Sunday they’ll give $100 million to Ivanka Trump’s proposed Women Entrepreneurs Fund.

MEDEA BENJAMIN: It’s just appalling to see Trump in Saudi Arabia, Amy, touting this $110 billion arms deal, when you look at the history of how those arms have been used. You talked about their use in devastating Yemen. We also have the example of them crushing the democratic uprising in neighboring Bahrain, using those weapons to fund al-Qaeda groups in Iraq and in Syria, and using those weapons internally to crush dissent, particularly in the Shia areas, which is happening right now with the Saudi siege of the Shia town of Awamiyah, that is getting absolutely no press in the United States. So, Congress does have the right—and, I would say, the obligation—to stop these arms deals. It didn’t do it under Obama. It’s time they do it under Trump. They’ll only do it if we, the people, put pressure on Congress to say no weapons sales to the repressive regime of Saudi Arabia.

AMY GOODMAN: And the fact that these precision-guided weapons that President Obama, under enormous pressure from peace activists and others for selling this to Saudi Arabia, finally stopped, the fact that Trump has resumed these weapons?

MEDEA BENJAMIN: Yes, he’s resumed those weapons. Again, Congress could stop it. And he also will probably be giving the green light for the invasion of the port of Hudaydah, which is where the majority of humanitarian aid comes in. The humanitarian community says that will be catastrophic.

So, I think, once again, we have to put the pressure on Congress to say no green light for the invasion of that port. And, in fact, what we do need is an emphasis on going back to the negotiating table, find a political solution to this crisis in Yemen, which is the furthest thing from what President Trump wants to do, because you could see from his trip to Saudi Arabia that this is all about encircling Iran, this is all about inflaming even further sectarian violence, which is what the U.S. has been doing by supporting the Saudi involvement in Yemen.

AMY GOODMAN: Why would the invasion of Hudaydah be catastrophic, as you say?

MEDEA BENJAMIN: Because this is where the food comes in. Ninety percent of the food in Yemen is imported. If they cannot get food into Hudaydah, which has already been hampered by the Saudi bombing of the cranes there and by a Saudi blockade of vessels coming in—but if they further destroy the ability to bring humanitarian aid into Hudaydah, it will result in a full-blown famine.

AMY GOODMAN: And cholera, the issue of cholera? Hundreds of Yemenis have now died because of the devastation of the sanitation system.

MEDEA BENJAMIN: Half of the medical facilities in Yemen have been destroyed, again, in the significant—most of them by the Saudi bombing campaign. You have now an outbreak of cholera that is declared a national catastrophe in Yemen, where they’re saying that now one out of every 10 minutes a Yemeni is dying from the effects of cholera.

AMY GOODMAN: Why do you think President Trump went to Saudi Arabia first, the first country in the world, his first foreign trip? Most presidents, since Reagan, have visited either Canada or Mexico as their first foreign trip.

MEDEA BENJAMIN: Well, first, Amy, think of all the protests that would have broken out in Canada and Mexico with Trump’s appearance. You didn’t see one protester on the streets of Saudi Arabia, because protesters would be arrested, flogged, beaten, tortured and perhaps beheaded. So it was a, quote, “friendly” place for Donald Trump in that respect.

He also wants to tout the weapons sales, and he talks about it in terms of jobs, jobs, jobs back in the United States. And he wants to, between the trip to Saudi Arabia and the trip to Israel, be sending this very clear message to Iran. And let’s be clear: The best foreign policy achievement of the Obama administration was the nuclear deal with Iran. This is something that Trump may well destroy.

AMY GOODMAN: Speaking to CNN Sunday, Democratic Congressman Adam Schiff criticized Trump’s position on human rights in his Riyadh speech.

REP. ADAM SCHIFF: I was also struck by the suggestion—and I think this is a broader element of the administration’s policy—that they’re going to de-emphasize issues of human rights, that what countries do within their own boundaries, we’re essentially going to look the other way. That’s not a high priority of ours anymore. The promotion of democracy, the promotion of human rights is going to take a backseat. I think that would be a terrible abdication of our global leadership when it comes to advocating for people who are the subject of persecution or imprisoned or journalists that are thrown in jail or people not allowed to practice their faith. I think it would be a historic mistake for us to walk away from that. And it was summed up, I think, most poignantly, to me, when Angela Merkel came to visit the president, when one of the headlines read, “The Leader of the Free World Meets Donald Trump.” That’s not what we expect of our president, and that needs to be—human rights need to be, nonetheless, a top priority for the United States.

AMY GOODMAN: Medea Benjamin, the issue of human rights in Saudi Arabia?

MEDEA BENJAMIN: It was quite ironic when Rex Tillerson was speaking at a press conference with the foreign minister of Saudi Arabia right next to him and said that he hopes the people of Iran get the freedoms of speech and association they deserve. And a reporter said, “What about Saudi Arabia?” He wouldn’t answer that question. So the selectivity is just astounding.

I think going to a country like Saudi Arabia, that has no free speech, no free association, no national elections, no political parties, no trade unions, where people like Raif Badawi, the blogger, is imprisoned for 10 years for blogging, where human rights lawyers are imprisoned for 15 years for defending human rights—it is appalling that Trump would go to Saudi Arabia and not even mention the issue of human rights, much less try to meet with one of the advocates for human rights, while he was visiting Saudi Arabia.

AMY GOODMAN: I wanted to go back to some of the comments Trump made about Saudi Arabia during his campaign, when he frequently denounced Saudi Arabia. In a Facebook post on June 16, 2016, he wrote, quote, “Saudi Arabia and many of the countries that gave vast amounts of money to the Clinton Foundation want women as slaves and to kill gays. Hillary must return all money from such countries!” In an interview with The New York Times last year, Trump also claimed that without U.S. support and protection, quote, “Saudi Arabia wouldn’t exist for very long.” During a February 2016 interview with Fox & Friends, Trump accused Saudi Arabia of being behind the 9/11 attacks.

DONALD TRUMP: Who blew up the World Trade Center? It wasn’t the Iraqis. It was Saudi. I mean, take a look at Saudi Arabia. Open the documents. We ought to get Bush or somebody to have the documents opened, because, frankly, if you open the documents, I think you’re going to see that it was Saudi Arabia.

AMY GOODMAN: That was Trump speaking in February last year on Fox & Friends. Medea Benjamin?

MEDEA BENJAMIN: He said a lot of truthful things during the campaign that now he goes back on as soon as he is president. It is quite astounding to see him in Saudi Arabia, the very country that is behind the 9/11 attacks, 15 of the 19 hijackers, that is still trying behind the scenes to stop the ability of 9/11 families to sue Saudi Arabia in U.S. courts, in fact has blackmailed the U.S., saying that it would pull out $750 billion of investments. And meanwhile, Donald Trump is trying to get them to invest more in the U.S. economy, so they can continue to blackmail us.

AMY GOODMAN: And I wanted to go to another comment he made, going back to Donald Trump on the campaign trail, at a presidential debate in October, accusing the Clinton Foundation of being a criminal enterprise for taking millions of dollars from Saudi Arabia and other countries.

DONALD TRUMP: It’s a criminal enterprise, Saudi Arabia giving $25 million, Qatar, all of these countries. You talk about women and women’s rights? So, these are people that push gays off business—off buildings. These are people that kill women and treat women horribly. And yet you take their money. So I’d like to ask you right now: Why don’t you give back the money that you’ve taken from certain countries that treat certain groups of people so horribly? Why don’t you give back the money?

AMY GOODMAN: So that was Donald Trump in October in a debate with Hillary Clinton. Well, in another deal reached over the weekend, the Saudi kingdom and the United Arab Emirates announced they would give $100 million to Ivanka Trump’s proposed Women Entrepreneurs Fund. Medea?

MEDEA BENJAMIN: It’s the height of hypocrisy. If the Saudis indeed wanted to help women entrepreneurs, they should lift the guardianship system that treats women as minors their entire life. They should allow women to drive. They should stop the gender segregation that exists at every level of Saudi society, from the schools to the business places to places of worship.

And to have Ivanka Trump being—meeting with Saudi women entrepreneurs and touting this new investment is absolutely ridiculous. Ivanka Trump could have met with the women who have been signing petitions asking for lifting of that guardianship system. She could have been meeting with the women who have been punished for trying to drive. Those would be good ways to help women entrepreneurs in Saudi Arabia.

AMY GOODMAN: Interesting, neither Ivanka Trump nor Melania were—Melania Trump, the first lady, were covered in—at the events and when Donald Trump spoke.

MEDEA BENJAMIN: Well, it’s also interesting that they were the only women at the events. You looked out, and you saw just a sea of men. And so, I think there are so many things that Ivanka or Melania could have done, could have said, that would show solidarity with the Saudi women who are fighting and have been fighting for decades for their rights. And yet they didn’t utter a word of support for those women.

AMY GOODMAN: Medea, what role did Donald Trump’s son-in-law, Ivanka Trump’s husband, Jared Kushner, play in making the arms deal happen?

MEDEA BENJAMIN: Right before Donald Trump’s trip, the son-in-law, Jared Kushner, was meeting with the Saudis to clinch this deal. And, in fact, in what was described as a jaw-dropping moment, he picked up the phone to call the head of Lockheed Martin to negotiate a better deal for the Saudis. You wonder why the representative of the United States is trying to get a better deal for the Saudis instead of the other way around. But he made sure that deal would be ready by the time Donald Trump got there to announce the $110 billion deal.

AMY GOODMAN: Medea, I want to ask you to stay with us, Medea Benjamin, co-founder of the peace group CodePink, author of the book Kingdom of the Unjust: Behind the U.S.-Saudi Connection. She wrote an article last week headlined “10 Reasons Trump Should Not Strengthen U.S.-Saudi Ties.” When we come back, she’ll be joined by Trita Parsi of the National Iranian American Council. Stay with us.

The original content of this program is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. Please attribute legal copies of this work to democracynow.org. Some of the work(s) that this program incorporates, however, may be separately licensed. For further information or additional permissions, contact us.
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Trump visits the Evil Empire and Sells USA military Power while Ignoring all Local Crimes against Humanity and Peoples in the Region


In his first foreign trip abroad as president, Donald Trump traveled this weekend to Saudi Arabia, where he signed a series of arms deals totaling $110 billion. This comes in addition to more than $115 billion offered in arms deals to Saudi Arabia by President Obama during his time in office. The deal also includes precision-guided munitions, which the Obama administration had stopped selling Saudi Arabia out of fear they would be used to bomb civilians amid the ongoing Saudi-led bombing campaign in Yemen. Since 2015, 10,000 people have been killed in the ongoing fighting, which has also decimated the country’s health, water, sewage and sanitation systems. The arms deal includes tanks, artillery, ships, helicopters, a missile defense system and cybersecurity technology. We speak to Medea Benjamin, co-founder of CodePink and author of the book “Kingdom of the Unjust: Behind the U.S.-Saudi

See or read entire story here: Medea Benjamin: Congress Should Halt Trump’s $110B Arms Deal over Saudi Atrocities in Yemen & Region

MEDEA BENJAMIN: Right before Donald Trump’s trip, the son-in-law, Jared Kushner, was meeting with the Saudis to clinch this deal. And, in fact, in what was described as a jaw-dropping moment, he picked up the phone to call the head of Lockheed Martin to negotiate a better deal for the Saudis. You wonder why the representative of the United States is trying to get a better deal for the Saudis instead of the other way around. But he made sure that deal would be ready by the time Donald Trump got there to announce the $110 billion deal.

AMY GOODMAN: Medea, I want to ask you to stay with us, Medea Benjamin, co-founder of the peace group CodePink, author of the book Kingdom of the Unjust: Behind the U.S.-Saudi Connection. She wrote an article last week headlined “10 Reasons Trump Should Not Strengthen U.S.-Saudi Ties.” When we come back, she’ll be joined by Trita Parsi of the National Iranian American Council. Stay with us.

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Good-Bye Misguided Memory of Robert E. Lee in USA History!!


New Orleans Removes Confederate Statue of General Robert Lee

MAY 22, 2017

H16 nola robert e lee statue

And in New Orleans, hundreds of people gathered to celebrate the removal of a massive bronze statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee on Friday. It was the last of a series of Confederate statues the city has removed in recent weeks. Workers wore bulletproof vests and face coverings to conceal their identities as they used a crane to remove the statue from a 60-foot-high pedestal. White nationalists have staged a series of protests and issued threats in the lead-up to the memorials’ removals. A car belonging to one of the workers had also been set on fire.

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Why was there No Indictment for White Officer Who Killed 13-Year-Old African-American Boy?


Ohio: No Indictment for White Officer Who Killed 13-Year-Old African-American Boy

MAY 22, 2017

H15 tyre king

In Ohio, a grand jury has refused to indict white police officer Bryan Mason for killing 13-year-old Tyre King in 2016. King was an eighth-grader who played football and was in the young scholars program at his school. He was playing with a toy BB gun near his home, when officer Mason chased him into an alley, allegedly confused the toy gun for a real gun, and then shot the boy repeatedly, killing him. King is at least the second person Officer Mason has killed over the last five years.

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Shooting of Tamir Rice – Wikipedia

The shooting of Tamir Rice, a 12-yearold AfricanAmerican boy (June 25, 2002 – November … Theofficers reported that upon their arrival, Rice reached towards a gun in his waistband. … that the 9-1-1 responder asked whether the boy was black or white three times; however, the question ….. Retrieved December 13, 2014.

Cleveland Officer Will Not Face Charges in Tamir Rice Shooting Death …

Dec 28, 2015 – The 12-yearold boy was killed as he was playing with a replica gun in a park. … that added to national outrage over white officers killing AfricanAmericans. … He said that there was noreason for the officers to know that, and that the … declined to indict a white police officer in Ferguson who fatally shot …

Chicago police officer who shot black teen 16 times charged with …

https://www.theguardian.com › US News › Chicago

Nov 24, 2015 – Laquan McDonald, the 17-yearold who was shot 16 times by officer Jason Van Dyke … Awhite Chicago police officer has been charged with murder over the … and other cities after youngAfrican American men were killed by police. … office, the officers unloads his entire gun into the teen, who spends 13 …

No Indictment: Ohio Jury Finds Police Shooting of 13-Year-Old Tyre King

3 days ago – No Indictment: Ohio Jury Finds Police Shooting of 13YearOld Tyre King … Braxton confirmed that the 13 year old boy was running away, not …

Prosecutors: White Chicago Cop Shot Black Teen As He Lay Dying

Nov 24, 2015 – Jason Van Dyke was charged with first-degree murder for firing a dozen … Prosecutors said the first shots spun the 17-yearold boy and sent his arm into the air. The next 13 bullets landed with dull thuds as McDonald lay dying on the … African Americans calling for police reform, chose not to participate.

Grand Jury Won’t Indict Officer in Killing of Boy, 13, Who Held BB Gun …

daily.news.itthon.ma/…/grand-jury-wont-indict-officer-in-killing-of-boy-13-who-hel…

3 days ago – Tulsa jury foreman: Shooting of unarmed black man ‘tragic but justifiable’ … of an unarmedblack man because there was no evidence the officer acted outside her training, the jury. … jury has voted not to indict a white Columbus police officer for fatally shooting a black 13yearold boy after a suspected.

Ohio: No Indictment For White Officer Who Killed 13 Year Old African …

bestsellermagazine.com/…/Ohio:-No-Indictment-for-White-Officer-Who-Killed-13-Y…

Ohio: No Indictment For White Officer Who Killed 13 Year Old African American Boy … Among those who have withdrawn their names are former FBI official … Ohio: No Indictment for White Officer WhoKilled 13YearOld African- · Ohio police officer who fatally shot black teen Tyre King helped save life of another boy.

Juvenile Delinquency in a Diverse Society

Kristin A. Bates, ‎Richelle S. Swan – 2017 – ‎Social Science

On July 13, 2013, a jury made up predominantly of white women found … were needed to indict Wilson, and the grand jury ultimately did not indict him.98 On … a 12-yearold AfricanAmerican boy, Tamir Rice, was shot and killed by a white … prosecutors hired their own investigators who wrote reports that theofficer’s use of …

Grand jury doesn’t indict officer for fatally shooting 13-year-old boy …

3 days ago – Grand jury doesn’t indict officer for fatally shooting 13yearold boy … jury voted on Fridaynot to indict a white Columbus police officer in the fatal shooting of a black 13yearold boy after a suspected robbery last year. … There he encountered a 19-year-old and Tyre, who fled. … Trump:America in crisis.

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Maryland: Another Hate Crime Death


Maryland: FBI Probing Murder of African-American Student as Hate Crime

MAY 22, 2017

H14 richard collins

In Maryland, the FBI is investigating the murder of an African-American student as a possible hate crime, after police discovered that his alleged killer was part of a white supremacist Facebook group called “Alt Reich: Nation.” University of Maryland student Sean Urbanski, who is white, has been charged with first-degree murder for fatally stabbing 23-year-old Richard Collins II, an African-American student at Bowie State University who was visiting the University of Maryland during graduation weekend. Collins was set to graduate this spring.

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WA: Trump Administration Promoting Nuclear Danger here in the Homeland


WA State: Officials Probe Possible Leak at Hanford Nuclear Site

MAY 22, 2017

H13 hanford nuclear site

In Washington state, authorities are investigating a possible nuclear waste leak, after radioactive material was found on a worker’s clothing. This comes less than two weeks after the Department of Energy declared a state of emergency at the Hanford nuclear site after a tunnel storing contaminated radioactive materials collapsed. Hanford is the nation’s most polluted nuclear weapons production site. Click here to see our full interview on Hanford when Democracy Now! was in Washington state.

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Brazil: Temer feels Temor


Brazil: Temer Faces Calls to Resign over Accusations of Accepting Millions in Bribes

MAY 22, 2017

H10 temer protest

In Brazil, protesters gathered in cities across the country Sunday to demand the resignation of President Michel Temer, following explosive testimony released by the Supreme Court Friday that accuses Temer of accepting millions of dollars in bribes since 2010. On Saturday, Temer vowed not to resign. But key political groups, including political parties, and the influential lawyers association have backed the impeachment calls. This is the president of Brazil’s Workers’ Party, Rui Falcão, at the protest Sunday.

Rui Falcão “All over the country, people are taking to the streets today in defense of direct elections now. Temer’s government has ended. He doesn’t have the moral and political legitimacy to end the country’s crisis. There are 14 million unemployed people already.”

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